Miltiades


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Miltiades

(mĭltī`ədēz), d. 489 B.C., Athenian general who commanded at Marathon. He succeeded his uncle as ruler (c.524 B.C.) of an Athenian dependency in the Gallipoli Peninsula. He accompanied (c.513) Darius in the Persian expedition into Scythia. Later he took part in the revolt of Ionian Greece against the Persians (499–493) and afterward fled to Athens. His experience and ability made him a powerful figure and he was elected to the board of generals to oppose the impending Persian invasion (see Persian WarsPersian Wars,
500 B.C.–449 B.C., series of conflicts fought between Greek states and the Persian Empire. The writings of Herodotus, who was born c.484 B.C., are the great source of knowledge of the history of the wars.
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). When the enemy arrived at Marathon (490), Miltiades went there to protect Athens from the land side. After a few days' delay the Persians began the march toward Athens, and Miltiades attacked. He had an infantry that was greatly outnumbered, but the Greek spears and armor outweighed Persian arms. The Athenian center gave way and the wings enveloped the Persians, vanquishing them. The Persians retreated to their ships and set out at once by sea to attack Athens, the army being absent. Perhaps the chief glory of Miltiades was that he brought his army, which had been fighting all day, in a 20-mi (32-km) race back to Athens; in the morning when the Persian fleet arrived off Athens, Miltiades and his army were ready. After the battle Miltiades was given a fleet. In 489, he made an unsuccessful attack on Paros. His enemies took advantage of the failure and had him fined. He died of a wound soon after.

Miltiades

 

Born circa 550 B.C.; died 489 B.C. Athenian statesman and general.

Miltiades came from the aristocratic family of the Philaidae. He was the father of the Athenian general Cimon. Between 523 and 513, Miltiades was exiled by the tyrant Hippias to Chersonesus Thracica, where he became tyrant, inheriting the position of his brother Stesagoras. Miltiades brought Lemnos and other Cycladic islands under Athenian rule. He supported the Greeks in Asia Minor in their struggle against Persia between 500 and 494. When the uprising was suppressed, he fled to Athens, where he was tried as a former tyrant but was acquitted. In 490, Miltiades was elected strategus and commanded the Athenian troops in the battle of Marathon. He then participated in the expedition of 489 against the islands that had broken away from Athens. For his unsuccessful military operation on Paros Island, he was sentenced to pay a fine that was above his financial means. Miltiades died in prison or, according to some versions, from wounds at an earlier date.

Miltiades

?540--?489 bc, Athenian general, who defeated the Persians at Marathon (490)
References in periodicals archive ?
At some point during the battle, Miltiades ordered additional soldiers to both of his flanks, a strategy immediately noticed by the Persians who assumed, incorrectly, that with the flanks strengthened, the center must have become substantially weaker.
67) Unless we accept D'Orville's emendation of Miltiades at Chariton 7,3,11, Chaereas, as a Dorian, omits mention of any Athenian victories before his Dorian audience.
In an audacious move, considering the staggering numerical superiority of the Persians, Miltiades ordered his men to form a single line, shoulder to shoulder, in equal width to the Persian horde and then, in an act his enemies thought to be complete madness, he ordered them to attack in a dead run.
The following day the troops on the Miltiades commenced to disembark and went their own ways for their various training camps.
First, the needs of all types of caregivers change over time as a function of the needs of their care recipients, the caregivers' personal and professional maturation, and the changing dynamics in and context of the caregiving relationship (see for example, Miltiades & Pruchno, 2001; Montgomery & Williams, 2001).
Supporting the commentary are 23 appendices containing such information as the oracles to the Dolonci and Miltiades, the political charges in Ionia after the revolt, and problems in the Argos narrative paragraphs 76-84.
Miltiades squinted, glanced to the water, then out to the flaming ships.
The church of Carthage was a leading light for early Christianity, producing some of the young faith's greatest theologians: natives Cyprian and Tertullian; resident Augustine; and three popes--Victor, Miltiades and Gelasius.
Miltiades presided over the Lateran Council that condemned a group of African schismatics, later known as the Donatists.
Miltiades Chacholiades (1990) International Economics McGraw Hill,.
Thelwall recalls figures like Pericles, Philip of Macedon, Alexander the Great, Themistocles, Miltiades, Demosthenes and Epaminondas, but also finds just such a leader in his own nation's history.
Because famous Athenian statesmen like Miltiades, Cimon, and Pericles tried to satisfy their fellow citizens' desires for empire, glory, and wealth rather than trying to make them better people, Socrates argued, these famous leaders were not truly statesmen.