Mima mound

Mima mound

[′mē·mə ‚mau̇nd]
(geography)
A circular or oval domelike structure composed of loose silt and soil that is believed to be generated by a combination of geomorphic processes and burrowing by animals; found in northwest North America, Africa, and southern South America.
References in periodicals archive ?
They cover using LIDAR to model Mima mound evolution and regional energy valances in California's Great Central Valley, "pimple" mound microrelief in southern Saskatchewan, alpine and montane Mima mounds of the western US, the biodynamic significance of double stone layers in Mima mounds, the forgotten natural prairie mounds of the Upper Midwest, and the polygenetic origin of prairie mounds in northeastern California.
10 ( ANI ): The mystery behind Mima mounds in Washington that has baffled scientists for decades, has finally been solved and gophers are being held responsible for the formations, a new study has suggested.
Mima mounds, which are found over the world, but more commonly in North America, measure up to 2m in height and 50m in diameter.
Gabet asserted that he was surprised to see that Mima mounds just started to form in the virtual landscape.
Then there are the Mima Mounds near Rochester, Wash.
You can visit the sulfur mine, the Mima Mounds, and - if you can find it - the Prosser gravity hill.
Mima mounds -- rounded piles of soil standing as high as 3 meters--appear clustered in diverse spots around the world and "may have generated a greater variety of hypotheses than any other geologic feature," says Charles G.
noticed that the pounding produced a pattern of bumps in the ash that looked suspiciously like miniature versions of the Mima mounds common near his home.
A similar interference pattern of earthquake waves, he reasons, could create Mima mounds in areas where a thin layer of loose soil rests on a flat section of rock or hard soil.