myna

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myna

or

mynah

(both: mī`nə), common name for any of a number of species of Asian starlingsstarling,
any of a group of originally Old World birds that have become distributed worldwide. Starlings were released in New York City in 1890; since then the common, or European, starling (Sturnus vulgaris) has spread throughout North America.
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 found chiefly in India and Sri Lanka, some of which are known for vocal mimicry. Most familiar is the hill myna, Gracula religiosa, a large (12–15 in./30–38 cm), glossy black bird with yellow head wattles. It is a forest dweller and lives mostly on fruits. In the wild state its calls vary from low chuckles to loud whistles; when trained it is a better mimic than the parrot. The common myna of S Asia, genus Acridotheres, is smaller (10 in./25 cm) and not so good a mimic. It and some other myna species have been introduced in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and elsewhere, and in these locations the common myna especially has often become an invasive species. The yellow-faced and long-tailed mynas are found on some islands of the S Pacific. Some species, such as the Bali mynah, are highly endangered. Mynas are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Sturnidae.

Myna

 

(Acridotheres tristis), a bird of the family Sturnidae of the order Passeriformes. The body length measures about 25 cm. The plumage is brown with white and grayish black. The myna is distributed in southern Asia. In the early 20th century it penetrated into Middle Asia and beginning in the 1930’s rapidly settled in the northwest, reaching Turkmenia, Uzbekistan, Karakalpakia, and southern Kazakhstan. A sedentary bird, it often lives in populated areas. It nests two to three times a summer. The nests are beneath roofs, in the walls of buildings, and, more rarely, in tree hollows or on cliffs. There are four or five light-blue eggs per clutch. The myna feeds on insects (including grasshoppers, whose destruction is beneficial) and berries (mainly mulberries). Mynas are often kept as pets, since the young birds can be taught to say words and even phrases.

myna

certain species are able to mimic human speech and other sounds. [Ornithology: Sparks]
See: Mimicry

mynah

, myna
any of various tropical Asian starlings of the genera Acridotheres, Gracula, etc., esp G. religiosa (see hill mynah), some of which can mimic human speech