mind

(redirected from Mindreader)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

mind

1. the human faculty to which are ascribed thought, feeling, etc.; often regarded as an immaterial part of a person
2. intelligence or the intellect, esp as opposed to feelings or wishes
3. (in Cartesian philosophy) one of two basic modes of existence, the other being matter

mind

the mental faculties, mental experience of the human individual, involving self-consciousness, ‘free will’, thinking processes and unconscious processes. It is a hypothetical, and sometimes metaphysical, construct, which expresses a holistic capacity based on the neurophysiological processes of the brain, yet additively becoming more than these, i.e. an emergent property. Philosophically, there are disagreements about the way to express these properties. Major disputes have existed on the mind-body relation, on whether or not mind and body are to be conceptualized as separate ‘immaterial’ and ‘material’ realms (See DUALISM. MATERIALISM). Related debates (in PSYCHOLOGY) surround the doctrine of BEHAVIOURISM, that scientific psychology can proceed only by analysis of overt behaviour, not mental events. It should be noted, however, that doctrines such as philosophical materialism, which reject a dualism of mind and body, are not necessarily committed to a denial of ‘emergent properties’ of mind for many explanatory purposes. See also STRATIFICATIONAL MODEL OF SOCIAL ACTION AND CONSCIOUSNESS.

mind

[mīnd]
(psychology)
The sum total of the neural processes which receive, code, and interpret sensations, recall and correlate stored information, and act on it.
The state of consciousness.
The understanding, reasoning, and intellectual faculties and processes considered as a whole.
The psyche, or the conscious, subconscious, and unconscious considered together.
References in periodicals archive ?
There, you can request more information, obtain a free quote or a demo version of MindReader.
Although a mindreader may well assume that a hiker in a hot emotional state will feel differently than a hiker in a cold emotional state, the attribution process is not supposed to be affected by which emotional state the mindreader is in--the same commonsense generalizations apply in both situations.
It is this ideational space that makes it possible for the mindreader to subsequently adjust his simulation routine to take those differences into account.
Research indicates that the curse can be minimized by having the mindreader recall a situation in which he was less knowledgeable than he is now before he determines how much the target knows.
The portrait of the mindreader that emerges in Robert Wilbur's poem of that name (26) is hardly less negative than Browning's, but the differences between the two figures are at least as instructive as the parallels.
On the contrary, the first dramatic monologues--those early experiments in a nascent genre which we associate with Browning and, to a lesser extent, Tennyson--are full of mindreaders.
Indeed, the traditional and the contemporary, cognitive-science senses of the term neatly converge in the imagination of Browning, who produced both calculating men of the Renaissance and conspicuous mindreaders, sometimes embodied in the same figures.
Granted, some waiters could possibly be mindreaders or have the power to look deep into your eyes and read your innermost thoughts.
We ask much of our police, but to expect them to function as mindreaders of the criminal classes is too far an expectation.
He was the chief director of the 1980s sitcom Newhart as well as the host of the short-lived Mindreaders game show in the late 1970s.
With every company bringing full-time mindreaders in, to check that no employee is even thinking something that might possibly be offensive to any other?