mind reading

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Related to Mindreading: mind games, mentalism, telepathy, Face Reading

mind reading:

see parapsychologyparapsychology,
study of mental phenomena not explainable by accepted principles of science. The organized, scientific investigation of paranormal phenomena began with the foundation (1882) of the Society for Psychical Research in London.
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; telepathytelepathy,
supposed communication between two persons without recourse to the senses. The word was formulated in 1882 by Frederic William Henry Myers, English poet, essayist, and a leading founder of the Society for Psychical Research in London.
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References in periodicals archive ?
That the focus on mindreading has led scholars to neglect the temporal dynamics of narrative is palpable in Palmer's definition of it as a "description of fictional mental functioning.
According to the received view, mindreading is the most fundamental of these abilities, the one that makes the others possible.
As scholars have pointed out, and as everyday experience confirms, "Whether we are sizing someone up or seducing him or her, assigning blame or extending our trust, we are very nearly always performing the ordinary magic of mindreading.
Let's accept that until we replace them with mindreading robots or insert liedetector implants into players' brains, football matches are being run on human guesswork.
Making sense of the social world: Mindreading, emotion, and relationships.
On the other hand the buffoonishness, the swiftness and the mindreading also remind us of the figure of the double in Dostoyevsky's The Double.
Eventually Wiseman highlights how entertainers fake mindreading and deals with the power of persuasion, and lucid dreams in passing.
On the night the 17-room CUC will be an expansive performance space featuring cinema screenings, salsa classes, Ableton Live workshops, and mindreading.
Charles (James McAvoy) is an Oxford University student who uses his mindreading powers to chat up girls.
737 (2009); Gregory Mitchell & Philip Tetlock, Antidiscrimination Law and the Perils of Mindreading, 67 OHIO ST.