Mineral Species

Mineral Species

 

a natural chemical compound characterized by a definite crystalline structure. The species includes the aggregate of individual minerals that have the same (or monotypic) crystalline structure and chemical elemental composition. The chemical elemental composition may vary within definite limits as a result of isomorphic substitution of crystallochemical analogues for the main elements: for example, wolframite and its varieties huebnerite Mn[Wo4] and ferberite Fe[Wo4], plagioclase and its varieties albite and anorthite, and olivine and its varieties forsterite and fayalite.

References in periodicals archive ?
A pre-requisite to defining a Mineral Resource for lithium in a pegmatite is a precise knowledge of the mineral species within the pegmatite, as grade alone is not sufficient.
002% of the planet's surface, yet beneath our rocky shores can be found samples of more than 90% of all mineral species ever identified - millions of years in the making.
Washington, Nov 26 ( ANI ): A new analysis of Hadean mineralogy challenges the assumption that the mineral species found on Earth today are much the same as they were during Earth's first 550 million years-the Hadean Eon-when life emerged.
Further work already underway will provide more information on the uranium mineral species and the potential to extract uranium in a leach solution, but we have been especially encouraged by the tenor of intersections late in the program where ore-grades seen elsewhere are now being regularly intersected at Theseus.
In terms of the number of individual mineral species she had more than 100, which was an impressive achievement considering that at that time the majority of the mineral species known today had not been discovered.
Andrada was the first to describe petalite, seapolite and cryolite; the mineral species andradite was named for him.
The gallery also explores how the world's more than 4,000 different mineral species are classified by chemistry and crystal structure and how mineralogists and geologists use physical properties, such as hardness, transparency, and lustre, to identify each species.
First mineralogical descriptions and chemical characterization of clay minerals and related phyllosilicates, including their macrocrystalline equivalents denoting mineral species or giving group and series names, go back to the 18th century: chlorite /a group name/, lepidolite /a series name/, mica /a group name/, montmorillonite, talc; terms mica, kaolinite (or kaolin), talc, similarly as "clay" or fuller's earth (Robertson, 1986), being still much older.
Now rewritten and greatly enlarged from the previous 1944 edition, the eighth edition offers a convenient one-volume presentation of the over 3,000 mineral species recognized to date.
More than 20,000 specimens include every mineral species and variety known to exist in the state, many from old locations depleted more than a century ago.
Additional modelling encompasses mineral species from the ions plus hydraulic conductivity, transmissivity, porosity, specific heat capacity, and a number of other items relevant to ionic mass transfer for in-situ solution mining.
When two or more mineral species crystallize in a rock, elements are systematically distributed between them according to pressure and temperature conditions that tell us where they formed.