Minerva

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Minerva

(mĭnûr`və), in Roman religion, goddess of handicrafts and the arts. Probably of Etruscan origin, she was worshiped in various parts of ancient Rome, most notably with Jupiter and Juno in the great Capitoline temple. Her temple on the Aventine Hill was a meeting place for skilled artisans, actors, and writers. She was identified with the Olympian Athena.

Minerva

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Minerva, asteroid 93 (the 93rd asteroid to be discovered, on August 24, 1867), is approximately 168 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4.6 years. Minerva was the Roman goddess of wisdom, the Roman equivalent of the Greek Athena. Minerva was also the patroness of arts and crafts. According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Minerva represents the principle of analyzing demands in order to alter behavior to please others and get their approval. This asteroid’s key word is “calculations.” According to J. Lee Lehman, the asteroids Pallas, Athene, and Minerva all represent the application of skill. In contrast with one another, however, “Pallas people are concerned with being right, Athene people are more interested in being competent, and Minerva people with being accomplished.” Jacob Schwartz gives this asteroid’s astrological significance as “broad perceptual skills and public relations strategies, ideas for pleasing others.”

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Lang-Wescott. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Minerva

 

in Roman mythology, a goddess, probably of Etruscan origin; patron of artisans and artists. With Jupiter and Juno, Minerva formed the Capitoline Triad, to which a temple was dedicated on the Capitoline Hill in Rome. From the late third century B.C., Minerva, who by then was identified with the ancient Greek goddess Athena, was also revered as the goddess of war and statecraft.

Minerva

the Roman goddess of wisdom