Mira-type variable

Mira-type variable

[¦mir·ə‚tīp ′ver·ē·ə·bəl]
(astronomy)
A member of a class of long-period variable stars whose prototype is the star Mira and that exhibit a periodic change in brightness with a time interval between 100 and 1000 days and a range variation of 2.5 magnitudes or more, but that have some cycles that may be much brighter or fainter than others.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The star cuddled up to UGC 12515 is the Mira-type variable W Pegasi, so perhaps we could call UGC 12515 the Ghost of W Pegasi.
However, this pair did not rank as high as WZ Cas for the fact that the red star is actually a Mira-type variable, pulsating with a much greater amplitude than WZ Cas and fading to as faint as 12th magnitude at minimum.
R Aquarii is, on first impression, a standard Mira-type variable, pulsing from about magnitude 6 to 11 and back every year and three weeks.
In addition, there are no naked-eye stars nearby, except when the Mira-type variable Chi ([chi]) Cygni is at maximum, which won't occur again until the latter half of October.
A beautiful example of contrasting star colors reappears every 15 months when T Cassiopeiae, especially red even for a Mira-type variable, rises to its maximum brightness.
What's the second-brightest Mira-type variable star after Mira itself?
R Draconis is a Mira-type variable star, an unstable giant star whose outer layers periodically expand and contract.
The most intensely studied N star is CW Leonis, while the Mira-type variable Chi Cygni is the brightest S star visible from Earth.
T Ursae Majoris, a red Mira-type variable star, pulses from about magnitude 13.
BRIGHT VEGA SHINES high overhead in September and October, and just a binocular field west of it is a Mira-type variable star to get to know.
It seemed like any other Mira-type variable when German asteroid hunter Karl Ludwig Harding discovered it in 1810.