Makeba

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Makeba

Miriam. born 1932, South African singer and political activist; banned from South Africa from 1960 to 1990
References in periodicals archive ?
Senegalese kora player Seckou Keita has spent nearly 20 years performing with major World Music stars including Yossou N'Dour and Miriam Makeba.
Parmi les pieces interpretees, de belles reprises de Brenda Fassie et Miriam Makeba.
Another factor in this increased consciousness seemed to be Miriam Makeba, godmother to Lisa--Simone's only daughter.
The tunes come not only from Dudu Pukwana, Mongezi Feza, Abdullah Ibrahim, Johnny Dyani and Chris McGregor, but also from aligned sources, Miriam Makeba and Joseph Shabalala (leader of Ladysmith Black Mambazo).
South African singer Miriam Makeba, better known as Mama Africa, was one of Kidjo's inspirations when she was young, so in honour of one of the first African superstars Kidjo also sang a covers, including Pata Pata and Malaika.
Le film est traverse par la figure inoubliable de la diva de la chanson africaine, Miriam Makeba.
A version of the song was performed as part of the controversial Graceland concerts in Zimbabwe in 1987 by Paul Simon and legendary South African musicians such as Miriam Makeba, Ladysmith Black Mabazo and Hugh Masekela.
The anti-apartheid and government-challenging lyrics of musicians like South Africa's Miriam Makeba and Nigeria's Fela Kuti have largely been exchanged for party-hard, live-the-rich-life lyrics.
The rooted singer draws his passion from the likes of Fela Kuti, Bob Marley and Miriam Makeba who left a legacy and put their countries on the map through the power of music.
12-15) draws from Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, interviews with Miriam Makeba, Christian prayers, and original text by Chipaumire.
Starting with tunes on the simple pennywhistle, the musical journey will take listeners through to the Kwela jazz sound and on to tunes from vocal legend Miriam Makeba, as well as South African musical icons Johnny Clegg and Mango Groove.
It was covered by many 1950s pop and folk revival artists, including The Weavers, Jimmy Dorsey, Yma Sumac, Miriam Makeba, and The Kingston Trio.