misogyny

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misogyny

[mi′säj·ə·nē]
(psychology)
Hatred of women.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their purpose is to counter her husband's misogynist perspective on female beauty and woman's reliance on that beauty for sexually evil and conniving gains (woman again as "foncierement " mauvaise et portee au vice" ["evil by nature and prone to vice"], as Pizan had defined the misogynist view).
Helisenne's misogynist husband is however incapable, as we have seen, of such restraint or of viewing woman and her activities "in their best light" ("de la meilleure part").
Of great importance to Crenne, I believe, and to our understanding of her portrayal of women as viragoes "exerceant oeuvres viriles" ("exercising manly tasks"), is precisely this story of creation, but not the one found in Genesis 2:21-22, whose misogynist interpretation Helisenne's husband, following the thinking of Du Pont and Matheolus, is so indebted to and obsessed with.
Indeed, what better way to discredit and debunk the misogynist principle with its biblical mandate for female inferiority and subordination than by documenting the successes of its object of scorn and ridicule in the biblical achievements of woman.
She overwhelms her misogynist adversary (as well as her reader) with all these memorial words on woman, with all her examples of good, intelligent, achievement-oriented women.
The Judith text, Helisenne tells her misogynist husband, is one of "tant de veritables histoires [which] a l'encontre de [son] inveteree malice faveur [lui] prestent" (K iii: "many examples from history with which to refute his inveterate ill-will").
Although we have discussed several of Crenne's letters, we have focused in this essay on her Epistre invective 3 because it is truly her best assessment, and ultimate refutation, of the misogynist position on woman's nature and her moral worth.
This is why she turns the misogynist argument of female sexual depravity and aggression against the accuser, in effect answering invective with invective:
The works of both authors are a defense of the female sex against the "damnables opinions" and the misogynist "obstination .
Neither Pizan nor Crenne will, however, answer the question of whether the misogynist perspective that holds woman to be 'foncierement mauvaise et portee au vice" ("evil by nature and prone to vice") will ever be amended, or is indeed capable of being amended.
The misogynist in Epistre invective 4, like Helisenne's husband in Epistre invective 3, is fervently implored to change his ways.
She is committed to spreading the gospel on woman, even if it means wielding the pen as a sword, as she has Helisenne warn the misogynist above in the closing passage from Epistre invective 4.