Missolonghi


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Missolonghi,

Greece: see MesolóngionMesolóngion
or Missolonghi
, town (1991 pop. 12,103), capital of Aetolia and Acarnania prefecture, W central Greece, a port on the Gulf of Pátrai. It trades in fish, wine, and tobacco.
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Missolonghi

, Mesolonghi
a town in W Greece, near the Gulf of Patras: famous for its defence against the Turks in 1822--23 and 1825--26 and for its association with Lord Byron, who died here in 1824. Pop.: 11 275 (latest est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
In Europe, the reactions were similar; Byron's voice did not "cease to be heard on the Continent when it was hushed amid the marshes of Missolonghi, but it echoed on to the Caucasus, to the Pyrenees and beyond" (Leonard 3).
Lord Byron moria en Missolonghi (Grecia) el 19 de abril, esto es, un dia antes de que Linati redactara esta carta a su amigo.
1824: Leading poet Lord Byron died of a fever at Missolonghi while aiding Greek insurgents against the Turks in their fight for independence.
In addition they were all romantics, of course, but after the beautiful example of Friedrich Schiller, or Byron going to Missolonghi to fight for Greek independence: They were "the last/supreme romantics," "ultimate romantics" as Peter Whitehead very aptly says about Godard.
It is then in a portion of Armance already laden with Byronism--in a portion of the novel where Octave is for instance specifically preoccupied by thoughts of fighting the Turks at Missolonghi (see OC 5: 183-84, 188), the Greek town where Byron prematurely and tragically had died of fever in 1824--that the first of Stendhal's direct allusions to Othello appears:
THE PHRASE "INHERITORS OF UNFULFILLED renown" is Percy Bysshe Shelley's, in his Adonais (1821), an elegy for John Keats, and could be applied to all three of the major poets portrayed in Young Romantics: Keats, who died of tuberculosis in Rome at the age of 25; Shelley, who drowned a year later, one month before his 29th birthday, in the storm that sunk his sailboat off the coast of Liguria; and George Gordon, Lord Byron, who died in 1824, 36 years old, of fever and bungled medical treatment at Missolonghi, where he had gone to join the fight for Greek independence.
On his earlier Mediterranean trip, Galt had undertaken various feats of speed-translation from Italian as a pastime--for instance, when confined indoors by wet weather in Missolonghi, or while in quarantine at Messina.
He makes Byron the hero of his opening section on the Greek-Ottoman war and comes around to Byron again at the end--not failing to note that he died in Missolonghi a casualty of fever not battle.
He fell ill and died in Missolonghi on 19 April 1824, and instantly became a hero of Greek history and an icon of the philhellenic movement in Europe.
When the Greeks welcomed Byron to Missolonghi in 1824 with parades and twenty-one-gun salutes, it wasn't for his prowess as either a politician or a military leader.
Demakes, La presse Francaise face a la chute de Missolonghi et a la Bataille Navale de Navarin: Recherches sur les sources du Philhellenisme Francais.
His death at Missolonghi glamorized in perpetuity the glory of fighting and dying for a foreign cause.