Mnemosyne


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Mnemosyne

(nēmŏs`ĭnē, nēmŏz`–), in Greek mythology, the personification of memory. She was a Titan, daughter of Uranus and Gaea. The Muses were her daughters by Zeus.

Mnemosyne

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Mnemosyne, asteroid 57 (the 57th asteroid to be discovered, on September 22, 1860), is approximately 116 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.5 years. It is named after the Greek goddess of memory, who was the mother of the Muses. The location of Mnemosyne by sign and house indicates something about how one remembers. When involved in inharmonious aspects, this celestial body may indicate a poor memory or unpleasant memories.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Mnemosyne

 

in ancient Greek mythology, a goddess from the generation of the Titans, the mother of the Muses by Zeus. She was the personification of memory. In an allegorical sense, Mnemosyne means memory.

Mnemosyne

goddess of memory; mother of Muses. [Gk. Myth.: Espy, 20]
See: Memory
References in periodicals archive ?
Let us now return to the scenes of instantaneous, immaterial thought transfer--between Apollo and Mnemosyne in "Hyperion.
Mnemosyne believes that by potentiating a specific NMDA subunit, the company's SNRM product candidates will provide therapeutic benefit for cognition, and also impact the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.
While Gombrich looks upon the strangely arranged material of the Mnemosyne panels (15) as on illustrative and practical solutions to represent the interrelations and interactions, Michaud treats the execution as a genre or a construction intentionally created exactly like that, something that is informative in itself.
5) Demonstrating the "profoundly religious attitude toward nature" that Aleksander Fiut sees in Milosz' work (1990, 2), Milosz' speaker is "[a]mazed that" his "Muse, Mnemosyne, / Has in no way diminished [his] amazement" of the oak forests through which he walks.
But the a- of amnesia is itself a negative prefix: the word mnemonics, and the goddess of memory Mnemosyne, point back to the root form mneme.
They are three of the nine Muses of Greek mythology, otherwise known as Erato (goddess of love poetry), Polyhymnia (goddess of sacred poetry) and Thalia (goddess of comedy), daughters of Zeus, and Mnemosyne (Titan goddess of memory).
The music on this CD was originally written about 400 years ago by John Dowland (1563-1626), but as sung by tenor John Potter (of the Hilliard Ensemble), accompanied by Stephen Stubbs (lute), John Surman (soprano saxophone and bass clarinet), Maya Homburger (baroque violin), and Barry Guy (double-bass), this music takes on a timeless quality, a quality that has been the hallmark of many releases from ECM, such as the Jan Garbarek/Hilliard Ensemble recordings Officium and Mnemosyne.
Under the influence of Mnemosyne, the goddess of memory and mother of the Muses, he wants to peel away the multilayered masks that make up his identity, even as he acknowledges the myriad deformations reflected in the mirrors of the enormous funhouse that is his life.
But is not Pavic rather propounding a reanimation of the myth of Mnemosyne, the poetic arche-anamnesis?
Annabella Kitson is the Editor of History and Astrology, the second edition of which is published by Mnemosyne Press.
That martyrdom, the extinction of personality in service of art, the removal from everyday life to what Pater elsewhere called "a refuge into a world slightly better--better conceived or better finished--than the real one" is what William VanderWolk more than ably chronicles in his examination of what I characterize as Flaubert's epic quest for Mnemosyne.
The Hireling and the Slave, (Charleston: Mnemosyne Pub.