Mo-Tzu


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Mo-Tzu

(mô-dzŭ) or

Mo Ti

(mô dē), c.470 B.C.–391 B.C., Chinese philosopher. His teachings, found in The Mo Tzu, emphasize universal love—that people should love all others as they love their own families and states. He also advocated moderation in social affairs, including funeral rites. At first a rival of Confucianism, Moism vastly declined in influence after about 200 years.

Bibliography

See his basic writings, tr. by B. Watson (1963).

References in periodicals archive ?
The author's chosen focus--Confucius, Mencius, Mo-tzu, Yang Chu, and Lao-tzu--may suggest that he is interested in the second issue: for those five figures are among the most influential and widely read today, but make up only a fraction of the available sources.
Press, 1956), [sections]80, argues that Yang Chu was not a well known thinker in his day, and that Mencius juxtaposed him to Mo-tzu (Mencius 3B.
Third, the title and structure as well as the name and characteristic speech of the key figure in Brecht's Buch der Wendungen ("Book of Twists and Turns," if you wish) all draw on the age-old tradition of Chinese philosophizing, and on Confucius's foe Mo Ti (or Mo-tzu, or Micius) in particular, thereby creating both a latter-day socio- and historico-philosophical manual of wisdom and a charming if sometimes quite cryptic literary chinoiserie.
In the Mo-tzu [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], we read the following story.
This story appears in the "Ming-Kuei hsia" [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] chapter; text in Wu Y[ddot{u}]-chiang [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], Mo-tzu chiao-chu [CHINESE CHARACTERS NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], ed.