Moab

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Moab

(mō`ăb), ancient nation located in the uplands E of the Dead Sea, now part of Jordan. The area is unprotected from the east, hence its history is a chain of raids by the Bedouin. The Moabites were close kin to the Hebrews, and the language of the Moabite stoneMoabite stone
, ancient slab of stone erected in 850 B.C. by King Mesha of Moab; it contains a long inscription commemorating a victory in his revolt against Israel. It was discovered at Dibon, Jordan (1868), by F. A. Klein, a German clergyman.
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 is practically the same as biblical Hebrew. The relations of Moab with Judah and Israel are continually mentioned in the Bible. As a political entity, Moab came to an end after the invasion (c.733 B.C.) of Tiglathpileser IIITiglathpileser III,
d. 728 B.C., king of ancient Assyria. He seems to have usurped the throne in 745 B.C. He bore the alternative name of Pul, by which he was known in biblical history (2 Kings 15.19).
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. Its people were later absorbed by the Nabataeans. The Moabite religion was much like that of Canaan. Archaeological exploration in Moab has shown that settlements first occurred in the 13th cent. B.C.

Moab

 

the ancient state of the Moabites, one of the tribes of Canaan.

Moab is believed to have arisen in the second half of the second millennium B.C. on the east bank of the Jordan River and the shore of the Dead Sea. For several centuries Moab carried on a struggle with the states of Palestine and southern Syria. In the llth and tenth centuries B.C., Moab evidently formed part of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah. In the ninth century B.C., it became politically independent. The most prolonged wars were carried on by King Mesha (ninth century B.C.), who expanded the territory of the state significantly. In the second half of the eighth century B.C., Moab came under the control of Assyria. (Moab is repeatedly mentioned in cuneiform sources.)

Of the pantheon of Moabite gods, the supreme god, Chemosh, and one of his hypostases, Ashtar-Chemosh, are well known. The Moabites wrote with the Phoenician script and were noticeably influenced by Phoenician culture.

Moab

Old Testament an ancient kingdom east of the Dead Sea, in what is now the SW part of Jordan: flourished mainly from the 9th to the 6th centuries bc
References in periodicals archive ?
Cohen (2007) points out a possible measurement problem related to the numbers that Gould and Moav base their findings on.
Galor and Moav (1999) From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation: Inequality in the Process of Development.
10) Galor and Moav (2005) study how increases in higher extrinsic mortality leads to an increased prevalence of somatic investment, which leads to greater health in the long run.
who co-authored this new theory with Omer Moav of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
The presentation will highlight actual testing results that show ARIES correlates with the characterization reference system at Rambus, provides world class repeatability for high yield in production, and delivers an unrivaled test time advantage of up to 10:1 for standard MOAV pattern testing of Direct Rambus devices.
The increase in mean annual rainfall in Moav and Edom, situated south of the west-east section of the 300 mm isohyet in Israel, is related to the orographic influence of the high elevation of this area.
The analysis relates to the literature on the long-term impact of factor endowments and institutions (Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson 2002; Galor, Moav, and Vollrath 2009; Nunn 2009).
Galor and Moav (2004) also emphasize the importance of income distribution for saving and bequests from a perspective different from that of the current paper.
That is a very powerful statement, repeated three times, which the rabbis let us know (7) refers to three places in Tanach that may otherwise suggest that God would favorably entertain a human sacrifice made to show one's love and submission to God; those three places are the story of Mesha, king of Moav (2 Kings 3); Jephthah, one of Israel's judges before Saul was named the first king of Israel (Judges 11); and Abraham at the Akedah.
One exception is Galor and Moav (2000), who construct a model of ability-biased technical change and examine how improvements in capital markets can broaden access to education and thereby affect inequality.