mockingbird

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mockingbird:

see mimic thrushmimic thrush,
common name for members of the Mimidae, a family of exclusively American birds, allied to the wrens and thrushes, that includes the mockingbird, the catbird, and the thrashers. Mimic thrushes are most numerous in Mexico.
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mockingbird

noted for mimicking songs of other birds; one of the world’s most noted singers. [Ornithology: Sparks, 116]
See: Mimicry

mockingbird

1. any American songbird of the family Mimidae, having a long tail and grey plumage: noted for their ability to mimic the song of other birds Austral
2. a small scrb bird, Atrichornis rufescens, noted for its mimicry

mockingbird

Software that intercepts communications (especially login transactions) between users and hosts and provides system-like responses to the users while saving their responses (especially account IDs and passwords). A special case of Trojan Horse.
References in periodicals archive ?
The northern mockingbird can impersonate animals, musical instruments, and dozens of other bird species.
Like a mockingbird, Tom perhaps realized that he could no longer continue to 'sing our song.
They sing their hearts out for us, that's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.
Harper Lee (right) had time to write To Kill A Mockingbird because friends clubbed together one Christmas to give her a year's wages with the note "You have one year off to write whatever you please.
Mashhood Roohul AminIn 1960, US fiction writer Harper Lee wrote one of America's most famous novels, "To Kill a Mockingbird," providing a glimpse of social conflict in those times.
41) Speaking more generally of "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking," Howard Nelson writes, "In it, the strands are fewer--the ocean shore, an early experience with mockingbirds, later experience of loss and grief and a new sense of self--and their weaving is more dramatic, elaborate, and anguished.
All told, 10 volunteers tested 24 nests at least five times last spring and summer, during the mockingbird nesting season.
Harper Lee's novel To Kill a Mockingbird was in danger of this fate of being critically ignored.
Two other mockingbirds (at different locations) were introduced to the apparatus but failed to master the removal of obstacles, preventing subsequent testing.
Hedge rows, shrubs and trees were common nesting sites of northern mockingbirds on campus.
Mockingbirds have been known to mimic over 40 different sounds, from pianos to sirens.