Sabellianism

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Sabellianism

3rd-century Christian heresy led by Sabellius. [Christian Hist.: EB, VIII: 747]
References in periodicals archive ?
In his letter, written shortly after Basil's, George argues that we should apply ousia to the Son to answer the modalist claim that the Son is merely the "words" spoken by the Father.
So by denying ousia, the Homoians have cleared the ground for subordinating the Son to the Father, which then allows them to refute the modalists.
Indeed, in the course of reciting this list, Basil names both Marcellus and Photinus--and only those two--and then suggests that having refuted and deposed the two great modalists, the church should have been free to be at peace.
It is also possible that Basil believes the modalists are guilty of the same thing, but for their part the real problem is that they do not attend carefully enough to the distinction implied by the names "Father" and "Son.
What he learned from Basil was an appreciation of how the Father-Son analogy can refute the Homoians while avoiding the modalists.
54) The Homoians sought to refute the modalist denial of Christ's preexistence by appealing to theophanies.
But, although Williams wisely eschews returning to "a lost golden age, if there ever was one" (149), his only suggestion is that universities retain an "essentialist Catholicism"--an unfortunate appellation, even more unfortunately defined by a vague sentence from John Paul II's Ex corde ecclesiae (1990) that implies a modalist trinitarianism (158)
In his famous lecture "That Marvelous Mystery--The Trinity" (1882) Keshub gave an original interpretation of the Trinity, which is however basically modalist.
He believes Christ's self-communication is his human love of neighbor and asserts in modalist fashion that "the Holy Spirit is Christ's human love of the Father" (64).
He notes that Ehrman thought that adoptionistic influence may have motivated the orthodox to remove "nor the Son," but Messer thinks that it was originally in the text and that the Modalists may have omitted it.
Modalists (note Sabellius) were strong monotheists who believed God was one person who could he seen by believers in three different ways or modes: Father, Son and Holy Spirit.
Hence, we sometimes are inadvertent modalists, thinking of God as one Person manifesting himself in three related but still quite different ways.