Modula-3


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Modula-3

L. Cardelli et al, DEC and Olivetti, 1988. A descendant of Modula-2+ and Cedar, designed for safety and simplicity. Objects, generics, threads, exceptions and garbage collection. Modules are explicitly safe or unsafe. As in Mesa, any set of variables can be monitored. No multiple inheritance, no operator overloading. Uses structural equivalence. "Modula-3 Report", Luca Cardelli et al, TR 52, DEC SRC, and Olivetti Research Center, Aug 1988 (revised Oct 1989). The changes are described in "System Programming with Modula-3", Greg Nelson ed, P-H 1991, ISBN 0-13-590464-1. "Modula-3", Sam Harbison, P-H 1992. Version: SRC Modula-3 V1.5.

ftp://gatekeeper.dec.com/pub/DEC/Modula-3/release/.

See also SRC Modula-3.

Modula-3

(MODUlar LAnguage-3) The successor to the Modula-2 language. Developed by Digital and Olivetti, it adds object-oriented extensions, automatic garbage collection and improved exception handling. It is considered an excellent teaching language.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, in SPIN, call-by-reference is almost always used to return additional results from a procedure, as Modula-3 only supports one result value.
SPIN uses a type-safe programming language, Modula-3, and a trusted compiler to provide this guarantee.
Consider the Modula-3 type hierarchy in Figure 1, which defines a type U, and V, a subtype of U.
TBAA assumes a type-safe programming language such as Modula-3 [Nelson 1991] or Java [Sun Microsystems Computer Corporation 1995] that does not support arbitrary pointer type casting, which is supported in C and C++.
In this section, we list the main requirements for an effective exception analysis for ML, and show that they go much beyond what can be expressed by exception declarations in Modula-3 or Java.
The extended static checking project [Leino and Nelson 1998] develops static debugging tools for Modula-3 and Java that keep track of uncaught exceptions.
For example, the SRC implementation of Modula-3 includes the Pickle interface for pickling values; this interface finds considerable use in persistent storage and distributed communication of program values, such as in the implementation of Network Objects [Birrell et al.
In this way safe dynamics may be seen as a useful compromise between name equivalence for type checking local communications and structural equivalence for type checking distributed communications (a central issue in the design of the type system for the Modula-3 distributed programming language [Nelson 1991]).
In declaring and raising exceptions, Exceptional C is the same as Modula-3, but the number of arguments of an exception has no limit.
which is similar to that of Modula-3, is used to bind handlers and cleanup resources.
Matching statements can be embedded in programs written in Modula-3 or in C.
The matching statement in Figure 3 expands to nested case statements totaling about 90 lines of Modula-3 code.