Modulor


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Modulor

A system of proportion developed by Le Corbusier in 1942. It was based on the theories of early civilizations and on the human form, and was related to the golden section.

Modulor

 

a system of proportions proposed in the 1940’s by the French architect Le Corbusier and his colleagues. The modulor is based on the dimensions and proportions of the human body (the initial quantities are the average height of a man, his height to the solar plexus, and his height with raised arms, which are assumed to be 183, 113, and 226 cm, respectively), the golden section, and Fibonacci sequences. The purpose of the modulor was to introduce a module based on human dimensions into modern architecture and artistic design. The modulor was used consistently in a number of Le Corbusier’s projects and has had considerable influence on world architecture, especially design.

REFERENCES

Le Corbusier, C. E. Arkhitektura 20 veka. [Moscow] 1970. (Translated from French.)
Le Corbusier, C. Le Modulor. Boulogne-Billancourt [1951].
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The modulor system was based on a long tradition of investigations conducted by creative geniuses from Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) to Leon Battista Alberti (1404-1472) and attempted to find harmony between human scale and architectural scale.
Emirates Precast, partly owned by Laing O'Rourke, manufactured the project's precast concrete frames, Crown House Technologies provided mechanical and electrical elements, and bathroom 'pods' were created by Modulor.
The first and one of the most influential of these was Le Corbusier who also proposed a short written groundwork to his system of proportions (based on the Golden Section) in the book Modulor (1951).
Or "In confinement my desolate mind and desires," the artist's Discoveries Prize-winning presentation at Art Basel Hong Kong in 2014, courtesy of Kolkata gallery Experimenter: Its central work--standard measurements for prison cells around the world, outlined with metal strips on the booth floor--was titled Modulor I after Le Corbusier's universally applicable "range of harmonious measurements to suit the human scale.
Axel Vervoordt and the Japanese architect Tatsuro Miki have designed five pavilions for the ground floor of the building, each constructed according to a system of 'sacred' dimensions, from the Fibonacci sequence to Le Corbusier's Modulor.
Finally, Hayama's work as Perriand's collaborator in charge of all the drawings, and her use of the Modulor for the Japanese Ambassador's Residence in Paris has been described in "Japan 1940-1 Imprint and Resonance in C.
Le Corbusier, a Swiss-born French architect of the Modern Movement, developed an anthropometric system of scale and proportion called The Modulor.
The transformation of form into a socially-useful unit of meaning is perfectly articulated by the source of the story's second pastiche: The Modulor (1954), Le Corbusier's combination memoir, manifesto, and textbook.
Oiza recordaba igualmente el alto interes que le produjeron las intuiciones sobre ciertos numeros, medidas y ritmos expresados por Le Corbusier en El Modulor, por lo que le recomendaba a Leoz que incorporara el tema de la escala y la medida real a su pieza, cosa que, quizas por este consejo de Oiza, quizas a consecuencia de su reflexion o el intercambio de ideas con Le Corbusier, Leoz si que incorporo posteriormente en su Serie Amarilla continuadora de las Series Azul y Roja del "modulor" de Le Corbusier (52).
El dibujo numero 880 combina distintos dibujos de animales junto al Modulor y una frase en la parte superior: "El urbanismo es una organizacion biologica".
Nuomones apie "Juodaji kuba" buvo publikuotos profesineje uzsienio periodikoje: Baltijos juros regiono leidinyje project baltia 09/02; olandu A10/ new European architecture 2009#26; sveicaru prestiziniame leidinyje Modulor 2009#3.
In the Poeme, a not exactly linear history of humankind takes one from 'pre-historical' imagery (dinosaurs, caves) through 'medieval' (churches), up to modern humankind featuring, so humbly, Le Corbusier's architecture (Marseille, Chandigarh) and other recognizable elements from the architect's repertoire (the Modulor, his modern measuring stick, and the Open Hand, a symbolic feature designating, to over simplify, the giving-and-receiving through creation).