Mohács

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Mohács

(mô`häch), town (1991 est. pop. 20,325), S Hungary, on the Danube. It is an important river port and railroad terminus and has metallurgical and timber industries. Mohács is best known for the crushing defeat (Aug. 29, 1526) there of Louis II of Hungary and Bohemia by Sulayman I of Turkey. Hungary was ill-prepared for the attack, and when Louis hastily tried to unite Hungary and Christendom behind him, only the pope sent help. With a poorly equipped and badly organized army of 28,000, Louis joined battle with a Turkish army of 200,000. The king and almost 25,000 of his army were killed in the battle; the rest were taken captive and massacred. The defeat brought with it more than 150 years of Ottoman domination in Hungary. At Mohács are monuments to the slain, regarded ever since as martyrs to Christianity and to Hungarian independence. Mohács was also the scene (1687) of a Turkish defeat by Charles V of Lorraine, which hastened the end of Turkish rule in Hungary.

Mohács

 

a city in southern Hungary, in the megye (county) of Baranya near the Yugoslav border. Population, 19, 600 (1970). Port on the Danube. Wood-fiber slabs are manufactured; a silk fabrics factory and flour mills are also located there.

Major battles took place near Mohács in 1526 and in 1687. The latter took place during the Austro-Turkish War of 1683–99 and ended in defeat for the Turkish Army.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Paolo Giovio wrote his Commentario de le cose de' Turchi for Emperor Charles V in the wake of the devastating Ottoman victory at Mohacs in 1526.
We didn't quite understand these words, but it was clearly a big deal: the "Disaster at Mohacs.
These masked men paddling in the River Danube are celebrating the annual Busho Festival, which takes place in the streets of Mohacs, Hungary.
Die Ubersetzungen der "Strategie der Entwicklung der estnischen Sprache (2004-2010)" in die ungarische und in die finnische Sprache (Eestin kielen kehittamisohjelma, Tartto 2005; Az eszt nyelv fejlesztesi strategiaja (2004-2010), Szombathely 2005) lieferten wohl dem ungarischen Botschafter Istvan Mohacs und dem finnischen Botschafter Jaakko Kalela den Anlass, sich an diesem Unternehmen zu beteiligen und beide betonten die Notwendigkeit um die Sorge und Erhaltung aller finnisch-ugrischen Sprachen.
And while Master Sun definitely deserves to be read, today's executives might get a bit more from learning of the ill-fated Battle of Mohacs, and how the tragedy that transpired there might inspire them not to repeat the mistakes of the past.
Mr Davies said he recently married his wife Aliz in her home village of Mohacs, in Hungary, and the traditional wedding celebrations would have been banned by health and safety officials here.
Suleyman famously defeated the Hungarian army at Mohacs in 1526.
Consider some examples: Masada (73 AD) for Jews; Hastings (1066) for the English; Kosovo (1389) for Serbians; Mohacs (1526) for Hungarians; the Plains of Abraham (1759) for the French; Culloden (1746) for Scots; the Battle of the Boyne (1690) for Protestant Irish; Gallipoli (1916) for Australians; Vimy Ridge (1917) for Canadians.
In the labor camp at Bor, Radnoti had the privilege of being kept in the (rat and lice-infested) hut reserved for baptized Jews; and in a little hell called Mohacs, he worked for the Wehrmacht on the first floor of a building in which unconverted Jews did the same work on the second.
In 1526, the Muslim Turks defeated the Hungarians at Mohacs.
When the last Hungarian king, Lajos II, died on the battlefield at Mohacs in 1526 fighting the Turks, the Austrian emperor became also the king of the Hungarians and of all the lands the Hungarian king used to rule.
Stephan pinned his colours to the mast of the Habsburgs and was killed at the battle of Mohacs in Hungary in 1526, the battle which saw Hungary or most of it become part of the Ottoman empire.