Mohammedan

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Related to Mohammedanism: Muhammadan, Mahometan

Mohammedan

and

Mohammedanism:

see MuslimMuslim
[Arab.,=one who surrenders (himself to God), an agent form of the verb of which Islam is a verbal noun], one who has embraced Islam, a follower of Muhammad. The form Moslem is also common in English; the term Mussulman is now rarely used.
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 and IslamIslam
, [Arab.,=submission to God], world religion founded by the Prophet Muhammad. Founded in the 7th cent., Islam is the youngest of the three monotheistic world religions (with Judaism and Christianity). An adherent to Islam is a Muslim [Arab.,=one who submits].
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 respectively.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Geert Wilders probably refers here to a quotation from Winston Churchill's book The River War (1899): 'How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries
To look at God in this light, as the Lord, and the Lord alone, is especially characteristic of Judaism and also of Mohammedanism.
Had Charles Martel not been victorious," Hitler told his inner crowd in August 1942, "then we should in all probability have been converted to Mohammedanism, that cult which glorifies the heroism and which opens up the seventh Heaven to the bold warrior alone.
He emphasized the historical and theological connection between Mohammedanism and Christianity, insisting that this connection forms an admirable basis for the successful conversion of the Saracens.
The leading features of Mohammedanism involve this- that in actual existence nothing can become fixed, but that everything is destined to expand itself in activity and life in the boundless amplitude of the world, so that the worship of the One remains the only bond by which the whole is capable of uniting.
When Ahmad's mother tells him, "I don't know how much to credit your Mohommedanism," he replies, "We don't call it Mohammedanism, Mother.
Franklin boasted that it was "expressly for the use of any preacher of any religious persuasion who might desire to say something to the people at Philadelphia; the design in building not being to accommodate any particular sect, but the inhabitants in general; so that even if the Mufti of Constantinople were to send a missionary to preach Mohammedanism to us, he would find a pulpit at his service.
In fact, the Founders actually gave some thought to the specific problem of Islamic regimes--as had Montesquieu, who wrote extensively on Mohammedanism and the problems of the Ottoman Empire.