molecular machine

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molecular machine

[mə¦lek·yə·lər mə′shēn]
(chemistry)
A molecular device in which the component parts can display changes (reversible movement) in their relative positions as a result of some external stimulus (such as light, electrical energy, or chemical energy), resulting in a signal (a change in a chemical or physical property of the supramolecular system) that can be used to monitor the operation of the device.
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: Telomeres, the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes, are one of the most versatile molecular machines of life.
Built following the instructions contained in our DNA, tiny molecules with specific 3D structures, known as proteins, act as molecular machines, carrying out specialist roles.
Previously, it was assumed that these reactions were carried out in modern cells by metabolic enzymes, highly complex molecular machines that came into existence during the evolution of modern organisms.
Life's ratchet; how molecular machines extract order from chaos.
The molecular machines are made in a solution that's then poured on the copper surface, and only cars that land right-side-up are drivable.
A number of computational approaches and methods for modeling energy flow in proteins and other molecular machines are described within the general themes of energy transduction in molecular motors, molecular dynamics-based methods and normal mode-based methods for simulating vibrational energy flow in proteins, and conformational transitions and reaction-path searches in proteins.
Nanotechnology is the engineering of molecularly precise structures and, ultimately, molecular machines.
Nature carries cargo throughout the cells using molecular machines," he says, and that opens up all sorts of possibilities for manipulating the system.
In chapter 4 Kitcher responds to Behe's claims that certain molecular machines could not have been built up in stages by natural selection.
Elsevier said that Nanomedicine is the first journal to be devoted exclusively to nanomedicine, that is, the emerging science of using molecular machines to treat human disease.
Group leader Rob Russell says advances in the study of functional genomics in recent years have provided the basis for knowing what components make up these molecular machines, even though little is known about what the structures look like.
Just as those claims were fanciful, forecasts of molecular machines, self-assemblers and nanobots are wildly unrealistic.

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