molecular memory

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molecular memory

A potential future memory technology that stores data at the molecular level. Using lasers and the bacteriorhodopsin protein molecule, the W. M. Keck Center for Molecular Electronics has built a molecular memory device holding several hundred megabytes. The advantage of such a memory is its small size and stability. It holds its content without power. See molecular electronics.
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According to Mentovich, the benefit of this product is that with the right equipment, which is standard in high-tech facilities, and his breakthroughs on how to put the transistors together, these molecular memories could be manufactured anywhere.
But two new studies show that reprogrammed cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells, hang on to molecular memories of their former identities.
Research results are presented for semiconducting and metallic nanocrystal memories, SONOS, MRAM, FeRAM, RRAM, and chalcogenide materials, polymer materials, and more recent advances in molecular memories.
Innovative ideas covering thin-film memories, molecular memories, bio-inspired memories and new architectures.
floating-gate and charge-trap non-volatile memories for embedded or stand-alone applications - resistive memory technologies such as phase-change memories and oxide-based memories - three-dimensional integration approaches to increase memory density - innovative ideas covering thin-film memories, molecular memories and new architectures.
While molecular memories or IBM's still-to-be-commercialized Millipede technology have been touted as revolutionizing the electronics industry, it has been the applications of basic science such as the nanometer thin films enabling GMR (Giant Magneto Resistance) that has provided the iPods we use today.
This, in turn, has led to the evolution of new non-volatile memory technologies such as magnetic, ferroelectric, phase change, carbon nanotube, and molecular memories.
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