Moloch


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Moloch

(mō`lŏk), in the Bible: see MolechMolech
or Moloch
, Canaanite god of fire to whom children were offered in sacrifice; he is also known as an Assyrian god. He is attested as early as the 3d millennium B.C.
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Moloch

 

(biblical Molech, Milcom), a god of the west Semitic tribes (referred to in the Bible as the god of the Ammonites); to propitiate Moloch, burnt sacrifices, primarily young children, were offered.

In the view of a number of scholars,“Moloch” was not the name of the divinity but was actually the ritual of the sacrificial burning of the children, the details of which are little known. The cult of Moloch became especially widespread at a later time in Carthage (introduced by the Phoenicians), as is testified by thou-sands of urns found with the ashes of children and by numerous inscriptions. The purpose and meaning of this ritual remain somewhat unclear. As an epithet,“Moloch” has come to mean a fearsome, insatiable force ceaselessly demanding human vic-tims.


Moloch

 

( Moloch horridus), a lizard of the family Agamidae. The type species of the genus Moloch, it is also known as the thorny devil. Body length, up to 22 cm. The head is small and narrow, and the broad, flat body is covered with curved, horny spines. The spines above the eyes and on the back of the head resemble horns. The body is brownish yellow with ocher stripes above and light ocher with dark stripes beneath. The moloch can change color in relation to variations in illumination and temperature. It lives in Australia in sandy deserts and feeds on ants, which it catches with its sticky tongue. It is active during the day. The female deposits six or seven eggs in a burrow, which hatch in 90–130 days.

Moloch

deity to whom parents sacrificed their children. [O.T.: II Kings 23:10]

Moloch

god to whom idolatrous Israelites immolated children. [O.T.: II Kings 23:10; Jeremiah 7:31–32, 32:35]

Moloch

, Molech
Old Testament a Semitic deity to whom parents sacrificed their children
References in periodicals archive ?
25) The Moloch image may have been suggested to Faulkner by a striking scene in one of the most remarkable expressionist films of Fritz Lang, Metropolis, directed in Germany in 1925, and which Faulkner possibly knew, since Lang, fleeing Nazi Germany, settled in Hollywood in 1936.
Can we not call this the Moloch Generation and is not Canada a fully qualified member?
But the road that led to Pumpkin and Muly Moloch was wonders all the way.
The mind is also linked with the evil, death and destruction associated with Moloch, who annihilates all imagination, sensual pleasure, compassionate emotion and creative and spiritual potential (I.
11) See respectively: regarding Moloch, Paradise Lost, 1.
When the Welsh Players crossed back across the Atlantic he stayed and became the toast of Broadway in Beulah M Dix's celebrated production Moloch.
This poet, with all the warmth given by the earth and the power of love, died as a nameless 'ordinary' soldier along with countless others, a sacrifice of the Machine State that devours its children like Moloch.
26 The moloch is a strange-looking but harmless kind of which creature?
In Moloch (1999), Sokurov imagined the private unraveling of Adolf Hitler, and Taurus (2001) is a portrait of Lenin's sad, isolated dotage.
If our cultural relativists must forgive those who sacrifice their infants to Moloch, they must also forgive members of their own society who wish to abide by their own traditions.
One envisions more of a confrontation between the Hebrew faith interacting with the adherents of Baal or Moloch.
Southey's ballad has power, power deriving from the abrupt juxtaposition of the sunshine on the Rhine shore with Hell-Mouth, black and gaping--power deriving from the horror in Margaret as she, symbolic of all the blooming good health of the countryside, sees her Faustian husband succumb to the hell within him by preparing to sacrifice his--and her--babe to Moloch.