Nazi-Soviet Pact

(redirected from Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact)
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Nazi-Soviet Pact

nonaggression treaty freed Hitler to invade Poland. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer, 685–705]
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Despite the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact and the pro forma allegiance of Germany and the USSR at the beginning of World War II, the Soviets kept the Katyn killings secret from the Germans.
Both Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union could agree on the decapitation of the Polish intelligentsia, "an attack on the very concept of modernity," Snyder writes, "a policy of de-Enlightenment" It was this mutual interest--fear of Poland--that brought the erstwhile antagonistic powers to sign the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact in 1939.
Romania allied itself to Germany to recover territories lost to Soviet Union after the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact.
Although Alexander Nevsky was withdrawn at the time of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact, Eisenstein's reputation continued to shine, and he was offered a commission to make a film on one of Stalin's most admired historical figures, Ivan IV, known as "the Terrible.
Truth be told, any influence that socialism and related ideas held over significant numbers of American Jews came before the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of August 1939, when Stalin's truce with Hitler put an end to the strange Jewish-socialist romance in America.
But the truly important part of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was its Secret Protocols, which divided Europe into two imperial domains, Stalin's and Hitler's, without the consent - or even the knowledge - of the nations consigned to them.
The Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Treaty, known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact, led to the partition of Poland between Germany and the Soviet Union.
At this time, the Estonian opposition also went through a major psychological shift after demonstrations, which took place in August 1987 on the anniversary of the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact, transpired with significantly less repression than in years past.
As one aide put it, "The Russo-Islamo-Sino Axis reminds Wolfowitz of the infamous Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.
It centers on the City College of New York, where Trotskyites dueled obsessively across the cafeteria alcoves with Stalinists about nearly everything: the New Deal, the Spanish civil war, the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, a thousand arcane points of Marxist theory, and, of course, the future of the world.
When World War II arrived, he suffered alongside his neighbors as Soviets assumed control of that part of Poland under the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact of 1939.
A year later, the Soviets signed the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, leaving Hitler free to invade Poland.