Monckton, Robert

Monckton, Robert

(mŭngk`tən), 1726–82, British general. After service in Flanders and Germany during the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48), he was sent (1752) to Nova Scotia, where he suppressed (1753) an insurrection of German settlers at Lunenburg. In 1755 he led a large force that took Fort Beauséjour and other forts from the French, establishing British control of Nova Scotia. He was made lieutenant governor of the colony and carried out the governor's orders in deporting the Acadians (see AcadiaAcadia
, Fr. Acadie, region and former French colony, E Canada, encompassing modern Nova Scotia but also New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and coastal areas of E Maine. After an abortive 1604 settlement of St.
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). He was second in command to James WolfeWolfe, James,
1727–59, British soldier. After a distinguished record in European campaigns, he was made (1758) second in command to Jeffery Amherst in the last of the French and Indian Wars.
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 in the campaign against Quebec (1759). In 1761 he was made governor of New York. He was commander of the land forces in Admiral George Rodney's expedition against Martinique (1761–62). He returned to England in 1763 and was succeeded as governor in 1765.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fatal problems have been exposed by the killings of Mary-Ann Leneghan, John Monckton, Robert Symons and Marian Bates - all by men supposed to be under supervision.
Fatal problems have been exposed by the killing of Mary Ann Leneghan, following those of John Monckton, Robert Symons and Marian Bates - all by men supposed to be under supervision.
He added: "The past two years have seen a number of tragic and avoidable killings, such as Marianne Bates, John Monckton, Robert Symons and now Mary-Ann Leneghan.