Mimulus

(redirected from Monkeyflower)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Mimulus

 

a genus of low annual or perennial herbs of the family Scrophulariaceae; they are rarely subshrubs. There are approximately 100 species, distributed primarily in the nontropical areas of America, particularly in the west. Some species grow wild in Europe. In the USSR there are three wild species (Far East) and three imported species. Some varieties are cultivated as decorative border annuals because of the unusual form and color of their large, bilabiate corollas. The most frequently raised plants of this genus are Mimulus guttatus, M. luteus, and their hybrid form—M. tigrinus. M. tigrinus is distinguished by the various colors and markings on the underside of its corollas.

References in periodicals archive ?
5 m above the ground on most overstory shrubs, herbaceous vegetation that was sparse and short, and an absence of low-growing shrubs except for occasional, unpalatable species such as southern bush monkeyflower (Diplacus longiflorus) and bush groundsel (Senecio flaccidus).
In the monkeyflower, for instance, genes that aid survival in inland soils probably pair well with genes underlying the live-fast-die-young lifestyle.
Also look here for yellow monkeyflower, sunflower-like balsamroot, and blue camas.
Pink Monkeyflower aids in fearlessly expressing love and intimacy and helps resolve issues of shame resulting from past sexual abuse.
md 366 26 yellowlip pansy monkeyflower, ITIS plant 27 nephroureterocystectomizing, from nephroureterocystectomy, books.
Bush monkeyflower (Mimulus aurantiacus), a Pacific Coast wildflower, has a reputation for being persnickety and intolerant of garden conditions.
deflexus), Kelso Creek monkeyflower (Mimulus shevockii), Rawhide Hill onion (Allium tuolumnense), carpenteria (Carpenteria californica), Greenhorn adobe lily (Fritillaria striata), and Piute Mountains navarretia (Navarretia setiloba) are not in imminent danger of becoming extinct or endangered.
Spring in the desert brings clumps of yellow, daisy-like Oregon sunshine and the tiny, pea-sized purple blooms of miniature monkeyflower.
It is the hope of the scientists at the conservancy that walkers along this path or another island trail might someday be able to witness a botanical miracle: the return of Trask's monkeyflower.
Some flowers you may notice along the way are yampah, antennaria, stickseeds (they look like forget-me-nots), arenaria, purple-flowering Sierra onion, sulfur flower (Eriogonum umbellatum), alpine shooting star, and several paintbrush, lupine, monkeyflower, and penstemon species.
The kenab ambersnail traditionally lived higher up on the banks and consumed both bacteria living on the crimson monkeyflower and decayed parts of its leaves, flowers, and stems.