monolith

(redirected from Monoliths)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

monolith

1. a large block of stone or anything that resembles one in appearance, intractability, etc.
2. a statue, obelisk, column, etc., cut from one block of stone
3. a large hollow foundation piece sunk as a caisson and having a number of compartments that are filled with concrete when it has reached its correct position

Monolith

An architectural member such as an obelisk or the shaft of a column consisting of a single stone.

monolith

[′män·ə‚lith]
(materials)
A large concrete block.

monolith

An architectural member (as an obelisk, the shaft of a column, etc.) consisting of a single stone.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this work, concentrated emulsion templating was employed to prepare porous polysulfone monoliths with a high porosity.
And now he was a monolith, for he had to be sculpted
Psycho-Delia, by the Welsh choreographer Sean Tuan John, and Monolith, by Spain's Toni Mira, are the most original, breathtaking, technically impressive and surreal dance performances I have seen in recent memory.
The popularity of monoliths has spread across a number of fields, including food and environmental applications, but it is with the great demands for speed and high resolution within the pharmaceutical industry, especially in peptide and protein research, that monolithic columns have found their core support.
The trail quickly circles to the east side of the canyon, such that the monoliths gleam in the sun's low rays as you gaze back toward the rim.
Mr Kindersley said: 'The setting up of a monolith to mark an important event, to confirm tribal ranking or to celebrate an astronomical conjunction goes back to the very dawn of mankind.
A GIANT postcard and enormous monoliths are among the contenders for our very own Angel of North Wales.
Photos taken in Venezuela or South Africa, for example, are literally "prolonged" in hand-drawn pendants executed several years later; a six-monitor video piece takes its images from a 1997 performance in Angola and its title from a seventeenth-century haiku; and an installation from the series "Nuevas architectures" (New architectures 2001), uses rice-paper lamps to construct millennial table-top cities where igloos, ziggurats, and pyramids coexist with modernist monoliths and futuristic towers undulating toward the ceiling/sky.
They stick out against the rolling hillsides that surround Simi Valley like a handful of proverbial sore thumbs, hulking monoliths that hold water for the houses below.
These monoliths serve more utilitarian purposes like storage or food preparation.
Ansel Adams' timeless photography, the valley's ice-crusted monoliths soaring above snowy meadows edged with evergreens, is "now playing" at Yosemite National Park.