Monsters


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Wikipedia.
Related to Monsters: Mythical monsters

Monsters

Abominable Snowman
enigmatic yeti of the Himalayas. [Tibetan Lore: Wallechinsky, 443]
Aegaeon
gigantic monster with 100 arms, 50 heads. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 5]
Ahuizotl
small creature with monkey hands and feet, a hand at the end of its long tail. [Mex. Myth.: Leach]
Ammit
part hippopotamus, part lion, with jaws like a crocodile’s. [Egypt. Myth.: Leach]
Amphisbaena
two-headed monster, either scaled like a snake or feathered; one head remains awake while the other sleeps. [Roman Myth.: White]
Anubis
jackal-headed god. [Egypt. Myth.: Jobes, 105]
Argus
hundred-eyed giant who guarded Io. [Gk. Myth. and Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
banshee
spirit with one nostril, a large projecting front tooth, and webbed feet. [Irish Folklore: Briggs, 14]
basilisk
lizard supposed to kill with its gaze. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Handbook, 93]
beasts of the Apocalypse
one has ten horns, seven heads, and ten crowns on the horns; the other has two horns and speaks like a dragon. [N.T.: Revelation 13:1,11]
bonnacon
Asian monster with bull’s head and horse’s body, and fatally incendiary excrement. [Gk. & Rom. Myth.: White]
bread-and-butter fly
its head is a lump of sugar, its wings are made of thin slices of buttered bread, and its body is a crust. [Br. Lit.: Lewis Carroll Through the Looking-Glass]
Briareus, Cottus, and Gyges
the three Hecatoncheires (or Centimani), giants each having 50 heads and 100 arms. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 118]
Brontes
cruel thunder-maker of the three Cyclopes. [Gk. Myth.: Pan finder, 47; Jobes, 251, 400]
cactus cat
has thorny hair and ears, knifelike leg bones, and a branched tail. [Am. Folklore: Botkin]
Cacus
fire-breathing giant monster. [Rom. Myth.: Kravitz, 49]
Caliban
misshapen “missing link.” [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
capricornus
half goat, half fish. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 450]
Cecrops
the traditional founder of Athens was half man, half serpent. [Gk. Myth.: Hamilton, 393]
Cerberus
three-headed watchdog of Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Avery, 270]
Charybdis
Poseidon’s daughter; monster of the deep. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
chimera
mythical creature: goat-lion-dragon; vomited flames. [Classical Myth.: LLEI, I: 325]
cockatrice
half-serpent, half-cock; kills with glance. [Heraldry: Brewer Dictionary, 243]
Cyclopes
Poseidon’s sons, each with one eye in the center of his forehead. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
divis
devils shown as cat-headed men with horns and hooves. [Pers. Myth.: Barber & Riches]
Echidna
half nymph, half snake; never grew old. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 85]
Fenris
frightful wolf, grew sinisterly in size and strength. [Scand. Myth.: LLEI, I: 328]
Frankenstein’s
monster created from parts of corpses. [Br. Lit.: Frankenstein]
Geryon
celebrated monster with three united bodies or three heads. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
Gorgons
monsters with serpents for hair and brazen claws. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 114; Gk. Lit.: Iliad]
Grendel
giant in human shape; lives in a murky pond. [Br. Lit.: Beowulf]
griffin
fabulous animal, part eagle, part lion. [Gk. Myth. and Art: Hall, 143; Ital. Lit.: Purgatory]
harpy
foul-smelling creature; half-vulture, half-woman. [Gk. Myth.: Mercatante, 212–213]
hippocampus
fabulous marine creature; half fish, half horse. [Rom. Myth. and Art: Hall, 154]
hippogriff
offspring of griffin and mare. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Hydra
seven-headed water snake; ravaged Lerna, near Argos. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Hall, 149]
Jabberwock
frightful burbling monster with flaming eyes. [Br. Lit.: Carroll Through the Looking-Glass]
Kirtimukha
the Face of Glory, depicted as a lion’s head, without body or limbs. [Hindu Myth.: Barber & Riches]
Kraken
giant snakelike sea creature. [Dan. Folklore: Merca tante, 194–195]
Ladon
dragon who guarded the Apples of the Hesperides. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 145]
Lamia
scaly, four-legged, hermaphrodite creature. [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 260–262]
Leviathan
frighteningly powerful sea serpent. [O.T.: Job 41; Psalms 74:14; 104:26; Isaiah 27:1]
Loch Ness monster
“Nessie”; sea serpent said to inhabit Loch Ness. [Scot. Folklore: Wallechinsky, 443]
Medusa
the only mortal Gorgon. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 161]
Midgard serpent
monstrous serpent that encircles the earth. [Norse Myth.: Leach, 723]
Minotaur
beast with bull’s head and man’s body. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 714]
mock turtle
turtle with a calf’s head, hooves, and tail. [Br. Lit.: Lewis Carroll Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
Naga
semi-divine beings with serpent bodies and human heads of terrible and ferocious aspect. [Hindu Myth.: Leach]
Nicor
Scandinavian sea monster; whence, “Old Nick.” [Br. Folklore: Espy, 44]
Nidhogg
terrible beast in Nastrond; gnaws ashtree, Yggdrasil. [Norse Myth.: Wheeler, 259]
nix or nixie
siren-like water-sprite, sometimes fish-tailed, that lured men to drown. [Teutonic Myth.: Barber & Riches]
opinicus
fabulous amalgam of dragon, camel, and lion. [Heraldry: Brewer Dictionary, 782]
Orc
monstrous sea creature; devours human beings. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Orthos
two-headed dog; brother of Cerberus. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 186]
python
huge serpent which sprang from stagnant waters after the Deluge. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 227]
Questing Beast
serpent-headed leopard that emitted loud noises. [Br. Lit.: Malory Le Morte d’Arthur]
roc
white bird of enormous size. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Second Voyage of Sindbad the Sailor”]
Sagittary
half man, half beast with eyes of fire. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Handbook, 947]
Sasquatch
giant hairy hominid said to lurk about the Pacific Northwest. [Am. Hist.: Payton, 601]
Scylla
half beautiful maiden, half hideous dog. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
siren
half-woman, half-bird, enticed seamen to their death with song. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 934]
666
number of the blasphemous beast with seven heads and ten horns. [N.T.: Revelation 13–14]
Sphinx
head and breasts of a woman, body of a dog, and wings of a bird. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 246; Gk. Lit.: Oedipus Rex]
Typhoeus
hundred-headed beast killed by Jovian thunderbolt. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1111]
Typhon
tallest of the giants; his arms and legs ended in serpents. [Gk. Myth: Benét, 1034]
werewolf
a man transformed into a wolf. [Eur. Folklore: Benét, 1082]
References in classic literature ?
But," pleaded the dear little woman, whom I had an immediate impulse, Perseus- like, to snatch from the jaws of her monster, and turning to the other lady of the party of four,--"but Mrs.
SATAN was now at hand, and from his seat The Monster moving onward came as fast, With horrid strides, Hell trembled as he strode.
Whereupon seven monsters, like himself, came towards him with reaping-hooks in their hands, each hook about the largeness of six scythes.
It is like a bric-a-brac shop, all monsters and dust, with everything priced above its proper value.
When, after weeks and weeks of cautious driving of scattered elephants across the hills, the forty or fifty wild monsters were driven into the last stockade, and the big drop gate, made of tree trunks lashed together, jarred down behind them, Kala Nag, at the word of command, would go into that flaring, trumpeting pandemonium (generally at night, when the flicker of the torches made it difficult to judge distances), and, picking out the biggest and wildest tusker of the mob, would hammer him and hustle him into quiet while the men on the backs of the other elephants roped and tied the smaller ones.
The lion's roar, the fierce wolf's savage howl, The horrid hissing of the scaly snake, The awesome cries of monsters yet unnamed, The crow's ill-boding croak, the hollow moan Of wild winds wrestling with the restless sea, The wrathful bellow of the vanquished bull, The plaintive sobbing of the widowed dove, The envied owl's sad note, the wail of woe That rises from the dreary choir of Hell, Commingled in one sound, confusing sense, Let all these come to aid my soul's complaint, For pain like mine demands new modes of song.
That these man-like creatures were in truth only bestial monsters, mere grotesque travesties of men, filled me with a vague uncertainty of their possibilities which was far worse than any definite fear.
In a moment my hand was on the lever, and I had placed a month between myself and these monsters.
The roads are very bad by land," quoth the venerable king; "and they are terribly infested with robbers and monsters.
A glance at a geological map will show that whatever truth there may have been of the actuality of such monsters in the early geologic periods, at least there was plenty of possibility.
That these monsters should tear each other to pieces was a part of the strange struggle for existence, but that they should turn upon modern man, that they should deliberately track and hunt down the predominant human, was a staggering and fearsome thought.
Both Woola and I had several narrow escapes from these greedy, arboreous monsters.