Monsters


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Related to Monsters: Mythical monsters

Monsters

Abominable Snowman
enigmatic yeti of the Himalayas. [Tibetan Lore: Wallechinsky, 443]
Aegaeon
gigantic monster with 100 arms, 50 heads. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Wheeler, 5]
Ahuizotl
small creature with monkey hands and feet, a hand at the end of its long tail. [Mex. Myth.: Leach]
Ammit
part hippopotamus, part lion, with jaws like a crocodile’s. [Egypt. Myth.: Leach]
Amphisbaena
two-headed monster, either scaled like a snake or feathered; one head remains awake while the other sleeps. [Roman Myth.: White]
Anubis
jackal-headed god. [Egypt. Myth.: Jobes, 105]
Argus
hundred-eyed giant who guarded Io. [Gk. Myth. and Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
banshee
spirit with one nostril, a large projecting front tooth, and webbed feet. [Irish Folklore: Briggs, 14]
basilisk
lizard supposed to kill with its gaze. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Handbook, 93]
beasts of the Apocalypse
one has ten horns, seven heads, and ten crowns on the horns; the other has two horns and speaks like a dragon. [N.T.: Revelation 13:1,11]
bonnacon
Asian monster with bull’s head and horse’s body, and fatally incendiary excrement. [Gk. & Rom. Myth.: White]
bread-and-butter fly
its head is a lump of sugar, its wings are made of thin slices of buttered bread, and its body is a crust. [Br. Lit.: Lewis Carroll Through the Looking-Glass]
Briareus, Cottus, and Gyges
the three Hecatoncheires (or Centimani), giants each having 50 heads and 100 arms. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 118]
Brontes
cruel thunder-maker of the three Cyclopes. [Gk. Myth.: Pan finder, 47; Jobes, 251, 400]
cactus cat
has thorny hair and ears, knifelike leg bones, and a branched tail. [Am. Folklore: Botkin]
Cacus
fire-breathing giant monster. [Rom. Myth.: Kravitz, 49]
Caliban
misshapen “missing link.” [Br. Lit.: The Tempest]
capricornus
half goat, half fish. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 450]
Cecrops
the traditional founder of Athens was half man, half serpent. [Gk. Myth.: Hamilton, 393]
Cerberus
three-headed watchdog of Hades. [Gk. Myth.: Avery, 270]
Charybdis
Poseidon’s daughter; monster of the deep. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
chimera
mythical creature: goat-lion-dragon; vomited flames. [Classical Myth.: LLEI, I: 325]
cockatrice
half-serpent, half-cock; kills with glance. [Heraldry: Brewer Dictionary, 243]
Cyclopes
Poseidon’s sons, each with one eye in the center of his forehead. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
divis
devils shown as cat-headed men with horns and hooves. [Pers. Myth.: Barber & Riches]
Echidna
half nymph, half snake; never grew old. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 85]
Fenris
frightful wolf, grew sinisterly in size and strength. [Scand. Myth.: LLEI, I: 328]
Frankenstein’s
monster created from parts of corpses. [Br. Lit.: Frankenstein]
Geryon
celebrated monster with three united bodies or three heads. [Rom. Lit.: Aeneid]
Gorgons
monsters with serpents for hair and brazen claws. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 114; Gk. Lit.: Iliad]
Grendel
giant in human shape; lives in a murky pond. [Br. Lit.: Beowulf]
griffin
fabulous animal, part eagle, part lion. [Gk. Myth. and Art: Hall, 143; Ital. Lit.: Purgatory]
harpy
foul-smelling creature; half-vulture, half-woman. [Gk. Myth.: Mercatante, 212–213]
hippocampus
fabulous marine creature; half fish, half horse. [Rom. Myth. and Art: Hall, 154]
hippogriff
offspring of griffin and mare. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Hydra
seven-headed water snake; ravaged Lerna, near Argos. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Hall, 149]
Jabberwock
frightful burbling monster with flaming eyes. [Br. Lit.: Carroll Through the Looking-Glass]
Kirtimukha
the Face of Glory, depicted as a lion’s head, without body or limbs. [Hindu Myth.: Barber & Riches]
Kraken
giant snakelike sea creature. [Dan. Folklore: Merca tante, 194–195]
Ladon
dragon who guarded the Apples of the Hesperides. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 145]
Lamia
scaly, four-legged, hermaphrodite creature. [Br. Folklore: Briggs, 260–262]
Leviathan
frighteningly powerful sea serpent. [O.T.: Job 41; Psalms 74:14; 104:26; Isaiah 27:1]
Loch Ness monster
“Nessie”; sea serpent said to inhabit Loch Ness. [Scot. Folklore: Wallechinsky, 443]
Medusa
the only mortal Gorgon. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 161]
Midgard serpent
monstrous serpent that encircles the earth. [Norse Myth.: Leach, 723]
Minotaur
beast with bull’s head and man’s body. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 714]
mock turtle
turtle with a calf’s head, hooves, and tail. [Br. Lit.: Lewis Carroll Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
Naga
semi-divine beings with serpent bodies and human heads of terrible and ferocious aspect. [Hindu Myth.: Leach]
Nicor
Scandinavian sea monster; whence, “Old Nick.” [Br. Folklore: Espy, 44]
Nidhogg
terrible beast in Nastrond; gnaws ashtree, Yggdrasil. [Norse Myth.: Wheeler, 259]
nix or nixie
siren-like water-sprite, sometimes fish-tailed, that lured men to drown. [Teutonic Myth.: Barber & Riches]
opinicus
fabulous amalgam of dragon, camel, and lion. [Heraldry: Brewer Dictionary, 782]
Orc
monstrous sea creature; devours human beings. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]
Orthos
two-headed dog; brother of Cerberus. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 186]
python
huge serpent which sprang from stagnant waters after the Deluge. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 227]
Questing Beast
serpent-headed leopard that emitted loud noises. [Br. Lit.: Malory Le Morte d’Arthur]
roc
white bird of enormous size. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights, “Second Voyage of Sindbad the Sailor”]
Sagittary
half man, half beast with eyes of fire. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Handbook, 947]
Sasquatch
giant hairy hominid said to lurk about the Pacific Northwest. [Am. Hist.: Payton, 601]
Scylla
half beautiful maiden, half hideous dog. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]
siren
half-woman, half-bird, enticed seamen to their death with song. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 934]
666
number of the blasphemous beast with seven heads and ten horns. [N.T.: Revelation 13–14]
Sphinx
head and breasts of a woman, body of a dog, and wings of a bird. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 246; Gk. Lit.: Oedipus Rex]
Typhoeus
hundred-headed beast killed by Jovian thunderbolt. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 1111]
Typhon
tallest of the giants; his arms and legs ended in serpents. [Gk. Myth: Benét, 1034]
werewolf
a man transformed into a wolf. [Eur. Folklore: Benét, 1082]
References in classic literature ?
Just imagine such a monster anywhere in this country, and at once we could get a sort of idea of the 'worms,' which possibly did frequent the great morasses which spread round the mouths of many of the great European rivers.
Take good care of these friends of mine," said the Lion, "and I will go at once to fight the monster.
But for your exceeding minuteness," he said, "in describing the monster, I might never have had it in my power to demonstrate to you what it was.
The death struggle of the monster lasted three days and three nights; in his writhing he beat his tail so violently against the ground, that at ten miles' distance the earth trembled as if with an earthquake.
The sight of that monster frightened him almost to death
The monster became a small island, a rock, a reef, but a reef of indefinite and shifting proportions.
he moaned, calling to her as he felt that she must be calling to him from the depths of that dark pit to which the monster had carried her.
This pretended foundling is a real monster of abomination," resumed Jehanne.