Montanists


Also found in: Dictionary.

Montanists

 

an early Christian sect, founded in Phrygia in the mid-second century and named after its founder, the priest Montanus. The sect spread to Asia Minor, Africa, Rome, Gaul, and the Balkans.

Following the traditions of the first Christian communities, the Montanists opposed the absolute authority of the bishops; their congregations were headed by “prophets” and “prophetesses.” The Montanists awaited the imminent second coming of Christ to the small town of Pepuza in Asia Minor and exhorted believers to renounce private property and mortify the flesh. These exhortations reflected a protest against the contemporary social order. Despite persecution by imperial authorities and the orthodox church, the Montanist sect survived up until the eighth century.

References in periodicals archive ?
One historian notes, "It is difficult to believe that the man who wrote the Apology is the same man who wrote On the Military Crown about fourteen years later, though the later document is a product of his Montanist [and thus, extremely sectarian] point of view.
Portals of the Montanist New Jerusalem: The Discovery of Pepouza and Tymion, JECS 11, 2003, 87-93 (partic.
Like the Montanist, an arrogant distinction was drawn between its superior members (The Elect) and the Outsiders (The Hearers).
Montanists and Quartodecimans who came from Asia Minor and continued their customs and theology in Rome.
The added prescript describes a visit by Paul to Smyrna, where he teaches that the Pascha should be observed during Passover, to distinguish Smyrneans from the Montanists.
Although this was written after Tertullian had joined the "heretical" Montanists, Roger "could sniff out nothing unorthodox in his ardent position; on the contrary, the resurrection of the flesh is the most emphatic and intrinsic of orthodox doctrines, though in our present twilight of faith the most difficult to believe.
The Montanists, moreover, called their movement the New Prophecy, since the Holy Spirit continues to give Christians new teachings.
It was a common semantic vocabulary used and reused by Pythagoreans, Christians, Platonists, montanists etc.
The Montanists of the second century, the movement of Cola di Rienzo in fourteenth-century Rome, the Anabaptist Kingdom of Muenster in the 1530s, the apocalyptic preoccupations of the Emperor Alexander I of Russia, the millennial visions of the Metis leader Louis Riel, and the twentieth-century People's Temple of Jim Jones and the Branch Davidians of Waco, Texas, and many more are described.
My favorite example of such a difference of opinion within the Christian tradition concerns the school of devotees in the early church called Montanists who believed that only by eating a steady diet of radishes could a person be saved.
Identifying which inscriptions actually derive from Montanists is slippery business.
Hinson responds to the doctrinal side of Bauer's challenge with a fairly traditional treatment--although the Montanists and Arius, for example, are given a more sympathetic reading than Marcion or the Gnostics.