Montferrat


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Montferrat

(mŏntfərăt`, –rät`), Ital. Monferrato, historic region of Piedmont, NW Italy, south of the Po River, now mostly in Alessandria prov. It is largely hilly, and wine, fruit, and cereals are produced. In the late 10th cent. Montferrat was created a marquisate held by the Aleramo family, and its rulers played an important role in the Crusades. In 1310 it passed to the Paleologo family. Casale became the capital of the marquisate in 1435. With the extinction of the Paleologo line, Emperor Charles V gave (1536) Montferrat to the GonzagaGonzaga
, Italian princely house that ruled Mantua (1328–1708), Montferrat (1536–1708), and Guastalla (1539–1746). The family name is derived from the castle of Gonzaga, a village near Mantua.
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 family of Mantua, despite the claims of the house of Savoy. After Francesco Gonzaga's death in 1612, Savoy renewed its claims on Montferrat and invaded (1613) the region. Spain and France intervened. The Treaty of Cherasco (1631) assigned parts of Montferrat to the house of SavoySavoy, house of,
dynasty of Western Europe that ruled Savoy and Piedmont from the 11th cent., the kingdom of Sicily from 1714 to 1718, the kingdom of Sardinia from 1720 to 1861, and the kingdom of Italy from 1861 to 1946.
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, and the rest (including Casale) followed the fortunes of the duchy of Mantua and passed to the Nevers (French) branch of the Gonzaga family. All of Montferrat was recognized by the Peace of Utrecht (1713) as belonging to the house of Savoy.

Montferrat

 

(Monferrato), a medieval Italian state in the Piedmont region. Formed in the late tenth and early 11th centuries as a marquisate, Montferrat came under the control of the dukes of Mantua, the Gonzagas, in 1536. It became a duchy in 1575. It was annexed by the Duchy of Savoy and Piedmont, partially in 1631 and then entirely in 1713 by the terms of the Treaty of Utrecht.

References in periodicals archive ?
The dialogue is between lay characters about human affairs, sex and power, even if Philip's passage to Montferrat is a stage on his journey to the Holy Land during the Third Crusade.
Philip arrives in Montferrat not for reasons of military strategy, but because he yearns to see the Marchioness.
This menu invites the leading question from the King, whether only hens are found in Montferrat, and no rooster (1.
Henry II married Isabella one week after the death of her husband Conrad of Montferrat.
Here Ricciardo Minutolo succeeds in deceiving and seducing Catella, Filippello Sighinolfi's wife, thereby presenting once again human relationships sharply in contrast with the story of the virtuous and clever marquise of Montferrat.
In brief, with her third tale Fiammetta offers an alternative to the story of the marquise of Montferrat, examines the weaknesses and failures of a jealous woman, and ostensibly supports marital infidelity, wishing a similar enjoyment to all listeners and readers, who may even ask a question not utterly impertinent: Is Catella ultimately cured of her jealousy, and, if so, is her conduct the proper way to overcome jealousy, and why does the jealous Fiammetta fail to follow Catella's therapeutic remedy?
The brigata's laughter at the end of Michele Scalza's explanation of ancestry's antiquity and nobility should not trick readers into a quick dismissal of the content's transgressive nature; namely, not only the parody of God's act of creation, described in Judaism's and Christianity's sacred books, but also the questioning of a principle at the basis of medieval society and of so many tales of the Decameron, including Fiammetta's tale about the marquise of Montferrat and the king of France.
This describes a sea battle between the fleet of Marquis Conrad of Montferrat, lord of Tyre, and the Muslims' Acre fleet, outside Acre in early spring 1190.
He challenges what he sees as Stronski's over-dogmatic negative conclusions concerning the historical reliability of the vidas, and revises previous identifications of senhals in Jordan's work, suggesting inter alia that the pro marques is likely to have been Boniface I of Montferrat rather than a count of Toulouse, and that Garin may be Garin d'Apchier.
Cellule marches publics, BP 249 route de Montferrat