moon illusion


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moon illusion

[′mün i‚lü·zhən]
(optics)
An optical illusion whereby the moon appears larger when it is close to the horizon than when it is higher up.
References in periodicals archive ?
Due to a little-understood optical effect called a moon illusion, it appears gigantic and striking and the clear skies enjoyed by many made for even better skygazing.
That's because of the well documented moon illusion which tricks our brains into thinking the moon bigger because it's closer to the horizon.
When the moon illusion amplifies a perigee moon, the swollen orb rising in the east at sunset can seem super indeed.
You will probably notice how big the Moon appears to the naked eye, but if you take a photo it will not be so spectacular as you remembered; this is an optical illusion, known as the Moon Illusion.
On Saturday, this moon illusion will amplify a full moon that's extra-big to begin with.
This combination of the moon illusion and close perigee gives sky-watchers a chance to see the biggest and fullest moonrise possible," Burress said.
But the Moon illusion occurs on the open sea and on the flatlands, too.
Last book read: The Moon Illusion, a collection of scientific papers on why the moon looks bigger on the horizon.
Statements about apparent size were rarely given empirical weight prior to experiments by Desaguliers, apart from the reports of the difference in the apparent size of the moon at the zenith and near the horizon--the moon illusion (see Hershenson, 1989).
Scientists have yet to unravel the so-called moon illusion.
gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2008/16jun_moonillusion/) as NASA notes, airline pilots have witnessed the Moon Illusion at high altitudes, where there are very few buildings about.
Today the Moon illusion is usually explained as a consequence of the eye and brain comparing the lunar disk with adjacent terrestrial references--like trees, buildings, or mountain peaks.