Moor

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moor

a tract of unenclosed ground, usually having peaty soil covered with heather, coarse grass, bracken, and moss

Moor

a member of a Muslim people of North Africa, of mixed Arab and Berber descent. In the 8th century they were converted to Islam and established power in North Africa and Spain, where they established a civilization (756--1492)
www.vivagranada.com/alhambra
www.spanish-fiestas.com/andalucia/history-moorish-spain.htm

Moor

 

(pseudonym of Dmitrii Stakhievich Orlov). Born Oct. 22 (Nov. 3), 1883, in Novocherkassk; died Oct. 24, 1946, in Moscow. Soviet graphic artist and one of the founders of the Soviet political poster. Honored Art Worker of the RSFSR (1932).

Moor was basically self-taught. By 1917 he had become an accomplished master of caricature. From 1908 to 1917 he contributed to the satirical magazine Budil’nik (Alarm Clock), in which, through his drawings, he served the cause of the proletarian revolution.

During the Civil War of 1918–20, Moor produced eye-catching posters imbued with revolutionary fervor; such posters included “Soviet Turnip “(1919), “Have You Volunteered? “(1920), and “Wrangel Is Still Alive, Finish Him Off Without Mercy “(1920). After the war, Moor created posters, including “Help! “(1921–22), “Worker, Be Vigilant!” (1937), and “What Did You Do to Help the Front?“ (1941), and satirical cartoons for the newspaper Pravda (from 1920), and the magazines Krokodil (Crocodile; from 1922), Bezbozhnik u stanka (The Atheist at the Press; 1923–28), and U stanka (At the Press; 1924–25). Moor also made india-ink illustrations for H. Barbusse’s novel Under Fire (1938; now in the Tret’iakov Gallery) and for Mayakovsky’s poem All Right! (1940; now in the V. V. Mayakovsky Museum, Moscow).

Moor’s drawings are expressive and at times contain elements of the grotesque; the contours of his drawings sharply outline the flat color areas. In 1928 he became a member of the Oktiabr’ (October) Association. Moor taught at the State Higher Arts and Technical Studios and the State Higher Institute of Art and Technology (1922–30), the Moscow Institute of Printing (1930–32), and the Moscow Art Institute (1939–43). V. N. Goriaev, A. M. Kanevskii, F. P. Reshetnikov, and B. I. Prorokov were among his pupils.

WORKS

labol’shevik! Moscow, 1967.

REFERENCE

Khalaminskii, Iu. Moor. Moscow, 1961.

A. D. KORZUKHIN

moor

[mu̇r]
(ecology)
bog
(engineering)
Securing a ship or aircraft by attaching it to a fixed object or a mooring buoy with chains or lines, or with anchors or other devices.
References in classic literature ?
The galleries that surrounded the court were festooned with a curtain of some kind of Moorish stuff, and could be drawn down at pleasure, to exclude the beams of the sun.
By these words he excited a desire in all who heard him, to know who the Moorish lady and the captive were, but no one liked to ask just then, seeing that it was a fitter moment for helping them to rest themselves than for questioning them about their lives.
We form rather more than half the list of white passengers on board a small steamer bound for the venerable Moorish town of Tangier, Africa.
The spirits of men and women who sup are mercurial things, and it was a gay leave-taking half an hour or so later in the little Moorish room at the head of the staircase.
As if the clock hadn't finished striking, and the convulsive little Haymaker at the top of it, jerking away right and left with a scythe in front of a Moorish Palace, hadn't mowed down half an acre of imaginary grass before the Cricket joined in at all!
In the open plain clouds of light horse galloped and swooped with swaying bodies and waving javelins, after the fashion which the Spanish had adopted from their Moorish enemies.
In England the folk-plays, throughout the Middle Ages and in remote spots down almost to the present time, sometimes took the form of energetic dances (Morris dances, they came to be called, through confusion with Moorish performances of the same general nature).
It was wonderful, for, with his beard cut to a point, his swarthy, sunburnt complexion, thin nose and his lean head there was something African, something Moorish in Captain Anthony.
That decisive chapter entitled 'Old and New Tables' was composed in the very difficult ascent from the station to Eza--that wonderful Moorish village in the rocks.
The Eastern voyagers go off dancing, like Papageno and the Moorish King in The Magic Flute.
The animal was probably indebted to the blood of Araby for its excellence, through a long pedigree, that embraced the steed of Mexico, the Spanish barb, and the Moorish charger.
I soon found the place I was in was not fit for my settlement, because it was upon a low, moorish ground, near the sea, and I believed it would not be wholesome, and more particularly because there was no fresh water near it; so I resolved to find a more healthy and more convenient spot of ground.