Moplah


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Related to Moplah: Moplah Revolt

Moplah

 

a Muslim sect among the Malayalis in southern India. The sect arose in the ninth century; its religious and administrative center is the city of Ponnani, where the chief Moplah educational institution, the Djemaat mosque, is located.

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This unpretentious eatery, run by the efficient Zainabi Noor, also specialises in Moplah dishes such as the Fish Biryani.
I knew I had some talent," says Rasheed, who visited Dubai from her hometown of Kozhikode, or Calicut, last week to share this little-known style of cooking with food lovers here during the Moplah food festival at the Taj Palace Hotel's Handi restaurant.
The Moplah rebellion especially gave Hindu organizations an opportunity to argue for consolidation.
great lady" who rules in that neighbourhood and exercises authority over three of the islands of the Laccadives, and is by race a Moplah Mohammedan.
The Moplah Rebellion of 1896: Communalism, Historical Narrative, and
Although the interpretation of the Saya San Rebellion seems to be a repetition of early Burmese revolts, it would be interesting to investigate whether other contexts such as the so-called Sepoy Mutiny or possibly the Moplah Rebellion (in southern India) might have informed British readings of the Burmese movements.
The current issue, which was running behind schedule, featured a walking tour of Granada (including a description in cinematic detail of its unparalleled stucco and plaster ornamentation), a memoir of the great and bloody Moplah rebellion of 1921 in Kerala by a Gentlewoman of Calicut, a letter about a rail journey from Istanbul to Paris by an emancipated Turkish lady, and of course, the Haj pilgrimage to Mecca by the widowed Shakila Rehman of Mymensingh who, Ammi declared in her editorial introduction, was an inspiration to us all.
In contrast with the Indian National Congress, more particularly the nonviolent struggle under the leadership of Gandhi and Nehru, the violent activities--sporadic killings or attempted killings of high British officials, or organized movements like the Uprising of 1857, the Moplah Rebellion, the Vellore Mutiny, or the Indian National Army under the leadership of arguably the most dramatic personality of the Indian nationalist movement, Subhas Chandra Bose--have received less attention.