Fictionalism

(redirected from Moral fictionalism)

Fictionalism

 

a subjective idealist philosophical concept that regards human cognition as a system of fictions that are justified in practice but that have no theoretical significance. The concept was given its most complete expression by H. Vaihinger. F. Nietzsche’s view of truth as a useful lie and the pragmatic theory of cognition are close to fictionalism. Fictionalism absolutizes the concepts and methods of thinking used in cognition that have no direct analogues in reality, for example the construction of ideal objects, working hypotheses, and several forms of modeling, and on this basis repudiates the theory of reflection. Fictionalism is a logical conclusion to the positivism of the 19th century; it has had a definite impact on present-day types of positivism.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Moral Fictionalism versus 'The Rest', DANIEL NOLAN, GREG RESTALL, and CAROLINE WEST
In particular, moral fictionalism is distinguished from moral quasi-realism, and fictionalism is shown to possesse the virtues of quasi-realism about morality, while avoiding its vices.
For it is also logically consistent with moral fictionalism, whose most common version maintains that, because morality is useful in certain respects, we should continue to make moral utterances and have moral thoughts, while at the same time refraining from asserting such utterances and believing such thoughts.