Moravian

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Moravian

1. of or relating to Moravia, its people, or their dialect of Czech
2. of or relating to the Moravian Church
3. the Moravian dialect
4. a native or inhabitant of Moravia
5. a member of the Moravian Church
References in periodicals archive ?
The increasing demand for music by these groups stimulated the American Moravians to a veritable frenzy of copying and transcribing from European masterworks as well as composing their own works.
23) In 1871, when Moravians celebrated their first century in Labrador, the entire Bible had been translated in several volumes into Labrador Inuktitut.
While Zinzendorf claimed that Moravians could still also be members of other churches, he did expect members to be in agreement with Moravian views.
The Moravians performed oratorios, such as Handel's Messiah, Rolle's Der Tod Abels, Graun's Der Tod Jesu, and Haydn's Die Schopfung.
Long relegated to the margins of historical inquiry, Moravians are now moving closer to center stage thanks to scholars like Jon Sensbach, Rachel Wheeler, Jane Merritt, and Katherine Carte Engel.
The proposed structure consists of the following operating files - Moravians - sewerage:
Records of the Moravians among the Cherokees; the Anna Rosina years, pt.
By this time the Moravians in the region no longer required those who attended their meetings to leave the Reformed Church, and in turn the latter allowed their parishioners to be involved informally in such meetings.
Records of the Moravians Among the Cherokees, Volume 2 1802-1805: Beginnings of the Mission and Establishment of the School is the second volume of primary testimony, gathered from archives documenting the Moravian Church's mission work among the Cherokee people.
Because defense against disease and depopulation was paramount for them, the Hudson Valley Mohicans wished to share in the protective relationships with sacred power that the Moravians appeared to enjoy.
It is Wheeler's narration and analysis of the Moravians and their Mohican converts that is the strongest and most interesting contribution of this book.