Morganatic Marriage


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Morganatic Marriage

 

a marriage between parties of unequal rank, in which the wife or husband, and children, do not enjoy the class privileges of the spouse. An example of a morganatic marriage would be the marriage of a man belonging to a royal house with a woman from a common family. Such a morganatic marriage confers the rights of succession to the throne neither to the wife nor to the couple’s children.

References in periodicals archive ?
A morganatic marriage is commonly defined as a legal marriage in which a member of a royal or noble family marries someone of lower status on the understanding that neither the spouse nor the children will have any claim in the inherited rank or property of the parent of higher status.
A morganatic marriage, specifying that the heirs could not legitimately inherit their parent's title of dignity, would alter the laws of the succession to the throne and would therefore require the application of the second paragraph of the preamble to the Statute of Westminster.
According to the Oxford Companion to Law, a morganatic marriage is "[a] legally valid marriage between a male member of royal, or princely, family, and a woman of lower birth or rank with the conditions that she does not acquire his rank and that any children are not to succeed to his rank, dignity or hereditary property.
Leslie (12) gives us an idea of the form morganatic marriage could take in England.
If a morganatic marriage in the British royal family is accompanied by provisions comparable to those found in Germanic law, the law respecting the succession to the throne would need to be altered to deny any hypothetical heirs access to the British throne.
Baldwin proceeded to frame a formal examination of the question of morganatic marriage.
As discussed above, if a morganatic marriage had the effect of denying any children access to the throne, the laws of succession would be altered.
Some of these provisions would necessarily be affected by a morganatic marriage that denies the children access to the throne.
If it were decided to celebrate a morganatic marriage in the royal family, a bill adopted to give effect to such a union would not necessarily alter the royal style and titles.
The legislation enabling a morganatic marriage would not necessarily have to include any specific reference to heirs.
If a morganatic marriage were celebrated today, the UK parliament would have to enact legislation and Canada would have to give its assent to that legislation.
And I am certain that a morganatic marriage is not a realistic option.