Mormyridae

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Mormyridae

[mȯr′mir·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A large family of electrogenic fishes belonging to the Osteoglossiformes; African river and lake fishes characterized by small eyes, a slim caudal peduncle, and approximately equal dorsal and anal fins in most.

Mormyridae

 

a family of fish of the order Mormyriformes. The body measures up to 1.5 m long. The snout is extended in a tube and is sometimes bent downward, enabling the fish to extract from the soil the invertebrates on which it feeds. Mormyrs live in fresh bodies of water in Africa. There are several genera (such as Mormyrus and Gnathonemus), comprising more than 30 species. Some representatives of the genus Mormyrus have electric organs on the sides of their tails, which serve for signaling (impulses are sent with different frequencies and received by other individuals). Mormyrs have commercial value.

References in periodicals archive ?
odoe is piscivorous, feeding on several species of smaller fish by laying ambush in dense vegetation, and they feed primarily on cichlids and mormyrids [4].
The diet of this species in the upper Zambezi consisted primarily mormyrids, followed by cichlids; small specimens (15cm SL) consumed more Barbus spp.
Squeakers or small catfish, and Mormyrids - also known as elephantfish - hunt at night by emitting tiny electrical charges, but live in fear of a far larger predator.
Tilapia species were consumed with the highest frequency (18%), followed by Synodontis or catfish (14%) and mormyrops or mormyrids (11%).
A large number of fish species (24) were consumed in the fishing villages with tilapia, synodontis (catfish) and mormyrids dominating consumption.
Glenn published these results in 1993, hypothesizing that catfish had selected weakly electric mormyrids as prey.
Dr Bernd Kramer of Regensburg University in Germany was intrigued by this data, thus joined SAIAB expeditions to Okavango Swamp and Upper Zambezi River, to record electric pulses produced by various mormyrids in the region, storing them on CD's.
Shifts in frequency tuning in androgen-treated mormyrid fishes.