Mornay, Philippe de, seigneur du Plessis-Marly

Mornay, Philippe de, seigneur du Plessis-Marly

(fēlēp` də môrnā` sānyör` dü plĕsē`-märlē`), 1549–1623, diplomat and publicist for the French Protestants, or HuguenotsHuguenots
, French Protestants, followers of John Calvin. The term is derived from the German Eidgenossen, meaning sworn companions or confederates. Origins

Prior to Calvin's publication in 1536 of his Institutes of the Christian Religion,
..... Click the link for more information.
, during the French Wars of Religion (1562–98; see Religion, Wars ofReligion, Wars of,
1562–98, series of civil wars in France, also known as the Huguenot Wars.

The immediate issue was the French Protestants' struggle for freedom of worship and the right of establishment (see Huguenots).
..... Click the link for more information.
); also known as Philippe Du Plessis-Mornay. After narrowly escaping the massacre of French Protestants in 1572 (see St. Bartholomew's Day, Massacre ofSaint Bartholomew's Day, massacre of,
murder of French Protestants, or Huguenots, that began in Paris on Aug. 24, 1572. It was preceded, on Aug. 22, by an attempt, ordered by Catherine de' Medici, on the life of the Huguenot leader Admiral Coligny.
..... Click the link for more information.
), Mornay became the chief diplomatic agent for the Huguenot leader Henry of Navarre, retaining that position after Henry was made (1589) king of France (see Henry IVHenry IV,
1553–1610, king of France (1589–1610) and, as Henry III, of Navarre (1572–1610), son of Antoine de Bourbon and Jeanne d'Albret; first of the Bourbon kings of France.
..... Click the link for more information.
, king of France). For his service he was made governor of the Huguenot stronghold SaumurSaumur
, town (1990 pop. 30,150), Maine-et-Loire dept., W France, on the Loire River. Saumur is noted for its religious-medal industry (dating from the 17th cent.) and for its sparkling white wines. Aluminum products, clothing, and liquors are also produced.
..... Click the link for more information.
, where he built the greatest of the Huguenot academies. His power waned after Henry's conversion to Catholicism (1593), but Mornay continued to exert a moderating influence on turbulent Huguenot affairs. Mornay was instrumental in the drafting of the Edict of Nantes (1598; see Nantes, Edict ofNantes, Edict of,
1598, decree promulgated at Nantes by King Henry IV to restore internal peace in France, which had been torn by the Wars of Religion; the edict defined the rights of the French Protestants (see Huguenots).
..... Click the link for more information.
), which established political rights and some religious freedom for the Huguenots. Louis XIII ousted Mornay from Saumur (1621). Mornay wrote many religious and political works, and is credited with writing the Vindiciae contra tyrannos (1579), an early tract advocating the people's right to resist an evil king.
Mentioned in ?