(The Muscovite), a literary and scholarly magazine published in Moscow from 1841 to 1856. Its publisher and editor was M. P. Pogodin.

In the 1840’s the journal promulgated the reactionary ideas of official narodnost’ (close ties with the people). Early in 1845, three issues of Moskvitianin were published secretly under the editorship of I. V. Kireevskii. The principal contributors to Moskvitianin were S. P. Shevyrev, F. N. Glinka, M. A. Dmitriev, and I. I. Davydov.

Beginning in 1850, the journal’s orientation under its so-called young editorial staff (A. A. Grigor’ev, A. N. Ostrovskii, and others) represented a variety of Slavophilism. Moskvitianin occupies a special place in the development of historical journalism in Russia as the first general “thick” journal that provided a separate section for the publication of historical and source materials.


Barsukov, N. P. Zhizn’i trudy M. P. Pogodina. Books 1–22. St. Petersburg, 1888–1910.
Dement’ev, A. G. Ocherki po istorii russkoi zhurnalistiki 1840–1850-kh gg. Moscow-Leningrad, 1951.
Bartenev, P. I. Ukazatel’ statei i materialay po istorii, slovesnosti . . . pomeshchennykh ν “Moskvitianine” za 1841–1855 gg. [Moscow, 1855.]