Perpetuum Mobile

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Perpetuum Mobile

 

(moto perpetuo), a 19th-century term for a virtuoso instrumental music piece, the melody of which is developed in notes of short duration at a tempo that is rapid throughout. The most widely known of these virtuoso pieces are Mendelssohn’s Perpetuum mobile for piano (Opus 119) and N. Paganini’s Moto perpetuo: Allegro de concert for violin and orchestra (Opus 11).

References in periodicals archive ?
This performance was full of character from seething waspish moto perpetuo passages in the second movement, to faultless horn and lugubrious solo from leader Rowan Bell.
A few, however, are different, like the well-crafted Chaconne in D minor, which injects a welcome touch of drama to the set, and the Scherzo in D major, an invigorating moto perpetuo that immediately grabs one's attention, then loses it in a middle section of yet more meandering country-lane pleasantness.
A Shostakovich-like oompah fairground sequence is followed by an enchanting section where otherworldly chords in the manner of Messiaen float over a baroque-style bass owing something to Pachelbel, and the final part of the triptych is a jazzy little moto perpetuo bopping away into the reverberation chambers.
Smetana From my Homeland/ Kocian Spring Song/ Dvorak Mazurek Op 49, Drdla Czech Serenade/Novacek Moto perpetuo, Fibich Poem/ Korngold Much Ado About Nothing - Suite op.
A shimmering moto perpetuo finale gave us spine-tingling true Sibelius, played with precision and expertise.
His opening movement, with its gorgeously unwinding melody, sang full-throatedly (a richness of tone surely pointing to Elgar); some contrasting dancing bow-work prepared the way for the finale's moto perpetuo which found Trusler's technique in dazzling form.
Like the Mahler, it claims an equilibrium between form and content, though the ear remains aware of only a moto perpetuo of unrelenting energy passing through great instrumental blocks of sound.