motor control

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Related to Motor skill: Motor skill learning, Fine motor skill

motor control

[′mōd·ər kən‚trōl]
(electronics)
References in periodicals archive ?
Clearly, developmentally appropriate fine motor skills and handwriting readiness deserve more space in the early childhood curriculum, and the benefit of more documentation and research.
Fundamental motor skill performances of children with ADD, LD, and MMR--a pilot study.
On the other hand, expert-novice comparisons have indicated that perceptual motor skills are task-specific and the level of expertise attained by extensive task-specific practice is considered to be more important than the age itself in the development of task-specific skills.
The children showed atypical sensory responses and very poor motor skills and DLS.
Visual perceptual-motor variables that may play an important role in the motor skill performance of children with VI are visual spatial perception, motion perception, and visual-motor coordination (Sleeuwenhoek et al.
Wrap up the lesson by discussing the following questions: Could spreading the news about how dramatically methamphetamine affects brain structure, memory skills, and motor skills help cut down the number of new users?
The movement outcome or the goal of the task can have a significant influence on the motor skill pattern that is observed (Hamilton & Tate, 2002; Hamilton, Pankey, & Kinnunen, 2002).
For the most part, motor skill is a relative term, implying that an integration of the perceptual processes has occurred.
Because it is a complex motor skill, this stance can only be used when survival stress has not fully activated the sympathetic nervous system.
As with most motor skills, the experience of cane travel is rich in intrinsic feedback information to be deciphered.
To learn new motor skills, the brain must be plastic: able to rapidly change the strengths of connections between neurons, forming new patterns that accomplish a particular task.
The third study examines the effects of a creative movement program on the gross motor skill abilities of Taiwanese preschool-age children.