Iwo Jima

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Iwo Jima

(ē`wō jē`mə, ē`wô), officially

Iwo To

(tō), volcanic island, c.8 sq mi (21 sq km), W Pacific, largest and most important of the Volcano IslandsVolcano Islands,
Jap. Kazan-retto, island group, c.11 sq mi (30 sq km), W Pacific. The group consists of three islands, of which Iwo Jima (Iwo To) is the most important. The highest peak (3,181 ft/970 m) is on Minami-iwo-jima.
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. Mt. Suribachi, 546 ft (166 m) high, on the south side of the island, is an extinct volcano. The main industries were formerly sulfur mining and sugar refining, but since World War II the island has been a military base. During the war Iwo Jima was the site of a Japanese air base, and it was taken (Feb.–Mar., 1945) by the United States at great cost to U.S. and Japanese forces. A photograph of U.S. marines raising the flag over Mt. Suribachi, which they called Meatgrinder Hill, is one of the most famous images of the war. Iwo Jima was occupied by the U.S. until 1968, when it was returned to Japan. Historically known to its residents as Iwo To, the island was called Iwo Jima by the Japanese navy officers who fortified it during World War II; both names mean Sulphur Island. The island was officially renamed Iwo To in 2007.

Iwo Jima

 

an island in the East China Sea, one of the northernmost Ryukyu Islands. Iwo Jima is a possession of Japan. The active Iwo Jima volcano, which is more than 701 m high, is located on the island. There are sulfur deposits.

Iwo Jima

inspiring American triumph in the Pacific (1945). [Am. Hist.: Leonard, 472–480]
See: Battle

Iwo Jima

an island in the W Pacific, about 1100 km (700 miles) south of Japan: one of the Volcano Islands; scene of prolonged fighting between US and Japanese forces until taken by the US in 1945; returned to Japan in 1968. Area: 20 sq. km (8 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Iwo Jima, mostly flat and featureless except for Mount Suribachi, translates to "Sulphur Island" in English.
As you step out of your aircraft and begin the walk to the barracks, you find yourself in awe at the sight of Mount Suribachi.
I would recommend it to anybody who has a passion for history and anybody who is willing to make the trip up Mount Suribachi to see what we were up against," said Hughes.
23, "Chuck" and three other men scaled Mount Suribachi, the island's tallest feature, in what many considered a suicide mission.
At Iwo Jima, Nutt climbed Mount Suribachi during the battle to set a survey signal there and by chance also visited his old college roommate, now Marine Captain Robert White, in his command post foxhole while Hell's kitchen was flying overhead.
To Your Families Two Flag's Raised on Mount Suribachi
The Marines had already captured Mount Suribachi (on 23 February 1945), and many considered the battle for the island to be almost over.
The recent passing of photographer Joe Rosenthal, noted for his photograph of the flag raising on Mount Suribachi, the newly opened National Museum of the Marine Corps at Quantico, Virginia whose very structure is designed to evoke that very scene, and the recently released movie Flags of Our Fathers have all drawn attention to a battle that was fought more than 60 years ago.
Marines in the Pacific, culminates in the mythic flag-raising at Mount Suribachi and includes three of the real flag-raisers--Rene Gagnon, Ira Hayes, and John Bradley.
The 2 1/2-hour movie comes on the heels of Eastwood's ``Flags of Our Fathers,'' which depicted the lives of the six men who raised the American flag on Iwo Jima's Mount Suribachi -- in one of the most celebrated war photos ever taken.
Based around the photo that would become America's iconic picture of the Second World War - six unknown Marines hoisting the stars and stripes atop Mount Suribachi - the film charts the lives of the picture's protagonists and their uneasy relationship with the word "hero".
In due course, Mount Suribachi is taken, and this time Eastwood hauntingly offers the historic flag-raising from the Japanese perspective at the opposite end of the island.