Mount Tamalpais State Park


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mount Tamalpais State Park


Location:At 801 Panoramic Highway in Mill Valley, north of San Francisco's Golden Gate; from Highway 101 take Highway 1 to the Stinson Beach Exit and follow signs up the mountain.
Facilities:16 developed walk-in campsites, 10 rustic cabins, picnic areas, trails (50+ miles), visitor center, exhibits, food service, 3,750-seat stone amphitheater, restrooms (é).
Activities:Camping, fishing, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, wildlife viewing, interpretive programs.
Special Features:Park includes 6,300 acres of redwood groves and oak woodlands, with a spectacular view from the 2,571-foot peak of Mount Tamalpais. On a clear day visitors can see the Farallon Islands 25 miles out to sea, the Marin County Hills, San Francisco and the bay, and Mount Diablo.
Address:c/o North Bay District Office
PO Box 123
Duncan Mills, CA 95430

Phone:415-388-2070
Web: www.parks.ca.gov/default.asp?page_id=471
Size: 6,243 acres. Elevation: 0-2,571 feet.

See other parks in California.
References in periodicals archive ?
I've loved Mount Tamalpais State Park since I was a kid because of its panoramic views of the Pacific Ocean and the whole Bay Area, its hiking trails, and its great mountain biking.
Coe State Park, California -- Malibu Creek State Park, California -- McKinney Falls State Park, Texas -- Mohawk Trail State Forest, Massachusetts -- Mount Tamalpais State Park, California -- Pocahontas State Park, Virginia
For maps, contact Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley 94941 (415/388-2595) or Mount Tamalpais State Park, 801 Panoramic Highway, Mill Valley 94941 (388-2070).
En route, visit Mount Tamalpais State Park and Point Reyes National Seashore.
These are held onthe new moon Saturday of each month at Rock Springs trailhead in Mount Tamalpais State Park.
Meet atBootjack Camp in Mount Tamalpais State Park for a 2-mile hike to a telescope.
In Mount Tamalpais State Park, one good, tough walk climbs out on Bolinas Ridge for views north to Point Reyes.
Now part of Mount Tamalpais State Park, the cabins were built at the base of Steep Ravine Canyon in the 1940s by a Marin landowner, William Kent, Jr.
Driving, you'll follow the lake's corrugated contours, cross the top of the dam, then ascend into wooded valleys leading to Ridgecrest Boulevard and Mount Tamalpais State Park.