Pine Beetle

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Pine Beetle

 

(Ips sexdentatus), the largest beetle of the family Scolytidae found in the USSR. The cylindrical body reaches 8 mm in length and is covered with long brownish yellow hairs. The apices of the elytra have six denticles each. The coloration is brown. The pine beetle, which is distributed in Europe and North Asia, infests the common pine, Siberian stone pine, spruce, fir, and larch. It usually inhabits the thick trunks of dead but not yet desiccated trees; it also infests and causes the death of weakened living trees. There is one generation each year. Control measures include notching and stripping the bark from affected trees before the beetles emerge and setting out trap trees whose bark has been removed during pupation of the insect larvae.

References in periodicals archive ?
The WRCD selected trees from the epicenter of the mountain pine beetle epidemic.
The funding will be used to support mountain pine beetle control actions in northern Alberta.
Modeling cold tolerance in the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae.
A report released by the Central 1 Credit Union concludes the mountain pine beetle epidemic that spread through the B.
Using the new approach, the research team- which also includes UBC's Joerg Bohlmann, Colette Breuil and Richard Hamelin- has compiled the first complete genome sequence of a fungus (Grosmannia clavigera) that is key to the mountain pine beetle infestation process.
The problem, I learned, was the mountain pine beetle.
The mountain pine beetle ravaging the forests of Western North America has claimed more than 33 million acres of trees in British Columbia and may affect some 2 million acres in the U.
In March 2008, women gathered at the University of Northern British Columbia to explore the social, economic and health-related impacts of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) infestation, and to identify issues and concerns as described by women in beetle-affected communities.
killed by the mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins).
The mountain pine beetle deserves at least as much attention as Northern Ontario in a Conservative budget, if only because it has more representatives in parliament.
In addition, over the short and medium-term, Canfor anticipates that there will be ample fibre available as a result of increased harvesting due to efforts to control a mountain pine beetle infestation.
The Clark's nutcracker is the primary seed disperser of the pine, but as whitebark pine populations decline due to other factors, such as mountain pine beetle and white pine blister rust, the Clark's nutcracker might move on to other pine trees as a food source, causing whitebark pine numbers to diminish further.