Kaddish

(redirected from Mourner's Kaddish)
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Kaddish

a prayer said for a close relative. [Judaism: Jobes, II, 901]
See: Grief
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mourner's Kaddish is an Aramaic prayer extolling the name of God.
Declining the young rabbi's offer to talk, Steadman opens the door to the sanctuary where a service is being conducted, and enters just as the leader reaches the point where the Mourner's Kaddish is recited.
In geonic times, the extended rabbi,c Kaddish began to be used at the graveside and then, first in medieval Europe and later elsewhere, the mourner's Kaddish was recited by mourners for various periods.
In his forties, long lapsed from Jewish orthodoxy, Wieseltier returned to the synagogue (to the shul, in the homelier Yiddish word he prefers) to say the mourner's kaddish for his father, three times a day for eleven months; puzzled by this taxing cultural imperative, which is neither biblical nor talmudic, he undertook an open-ended search through Jewish literature to find the sources of the practice.
The League called the caricature of Granpa Boris reminiscent of Nazi-era depictions of Jews and said the use of the Mourner's Kaddish demeans the prayer's solemnity.
Last of all is the Mourner's Kaddish, recited in a sunny Russian cemetery: Shteyngart dutifully reads the Hebrew words that are "gibberish" to the three of them.
I am ready to stand and say mourner's kaddish at my synagogue on Shabbat, to light a yahrzeit candle, to go to morning minyan on May 14.
Rabbi Seth Bernstein recited the mourner's kaddish.
The traditional Jewish mourner's Kaddish, attended by 250 mourners from Orange and Los Angeles counties, honored the Columbia crew by singing songs and lighting seven candles in their memories.
The practice of reciting the mourner's kaddish seems to have begun in the years just after the Crusades, when a superabundance of mourners led to the tradition of linking personal grief with the collective grief of the Jewish people.
I have always read the Mourner's Kaddish as a unique provocation to God.
Rabbi Mark Blazer played recordings from 9-11, tribute songs, a healing prayer and recited the traditional mourner's kaddish.