Kaddish

(redirected from Mourner's Kaddish)
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Kaddish

a prayer said for a close relative. [Judaism: Jobes, II, 901]
See: Grief
References in periodicals archive ?
The Seder Ray Amram Ga'on (ninth century) lists the text of the half-Kaddish, the full Kaddish, and the rabbinic Kaddish, but no mourner's Kaddish as we know that from later times (on these forms, see below).
Once the mourner's kaddish had taken on more or less its present liturgical usage, in the late Middle Ages, it served a purgatorial function: the deliverance of the father's soul by the son's Jewish learning and diligence.
The caricature of Granpa Boris is reminiscent of stereotypical Nazi-era depictions of Jews and the use of the Mourner's Kaddish in a jocular fashion demeans the solemnity of the prayer," said Foxman.
As the Sonderkommando plans a rebellion, Saul decides to carry out an impossible task: save the child's body from the flames, find a rabbi to recite the mourner's Kaddish and offer the boy a proper burial.
I have always read the Mourner's Kaddish as a unique provocation to God.
Rabbi Seth Bernstein recited the mourner's kaddish.
The traditional Jewish mourner's Kaddish, attended by 250 mourners from Orange and Los Angeles counties, honored the Columbia crew by singing songs and lighting seven candles in their memories.
The practice of reciting the mourner's kaddish seems to have begun in the years just after the Crusades, when a superabundance of mourners led to the tradition of linking personal grief with the collective grief of the Jewish people.
Rabbi Mark Blazer played recordings from 9-11, tribute songs, a healing prayer and recited the traditional mourner's kaddish.
Other aspects of the service include remarks from the Israeli Consul General, a proclamation from the City of Houston, songs by the Houston Cantorial Association, poetry readings, and the reading of the Mourner's Kaddish.
The argument is all the more compelling when we realize that the elicitation of "yehei shemei rabba" in response to mourner's Kaddish is a form of kiddush haShem (the public sanctification of God's name), and not only are women fully obligated in that mitzvah, but, according to some authorities, because of that obligation they may count in the minyan required for such a public sanctification.
That's a testament to their existence,'' said Rabbi Mark Blazer, who recited the traditional mourner's kaddish.