Mouse-Tailed Bat


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Mouse-Tailed Bat

 

any one mammal of the family Rhinopomatidae of the order Chiroptera. The body length ranges from 6 to 8 cm. The tail, which is up to 6 cm long is enclosed only at its base in the caudal membrane. There is one genus with four species, distributed in North and Central Africa, Southwest and southern Asia, and on some islands of the Malay Archipelago. Mouse-tailed bats often inhabit caves, churches, and large residential structures. They feed on insects and reproduce once a year. The type species is Rhinopoma microphyllum.

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Bamou National Park is one of the main habitats of the Persian leopard as well as several other threatened species such as the jungle cat, wildcat, wild goat, lesser mouse-tailed bat and owl.
Present investigation was carried out to understand morphological differences in two closely related congeners, the greater mouse-tailed bat Rhinopomamicrophyllum (Brunnich, 1782) and the lesser mouse tailed bat Rhinopomahardwickii (Gray, 1831).
Geoffroy, 1818 is globally represented by four species and three of them, the lesser mouse-tailed bat R.
A new species of mouse-tailed bat (Chiroptera: Rhinopomatidae: Rhinopoma) from Yemen, J.
The greater mouse-tailed bat (Rhinopoma microphyllum) uses a type of sonar mechanism to navigate and find prey.
These chips were fitted on to the greater mouse-tailed bats, a highly social species of bats that migrate to spend the summer in Israel.
First record of the lesser mouse-tailed bat Rhinopoma hardwickii (Rhinopomatidae: Chiroptera) from southern Punjab, Pakistan.
The lesser mouse-tailed bat Rhinopoma hardwickii Gray, 1831 has not been recorded from Pakistan except from northern Punjab (Rohtas) and southern Sindh (Karachi, Landhi and Karchat Hills near Hyderabad).
The lesser mouse-tailed bat, Rhinopoma hardwickii Gray, 1831 is distributed from Morocco to Burma, south to Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger and Kenya and Socotora Isles (Yemen).
When greater mouse-tailed bats (Rhinopoma microphyllum) spot a meal of flying ants with echolocation, they emit a "feeding buzz" made up of many short cries.
Rhinopoma hardwickii or less mouse-tailed bats belong to Rhinopomatidae that are insectivore.
Unlike other bats, the mouse-tailed bats use a flying technique called flutter-gliding--just as it sounds, they flutter a bit and then glide.