Mousterian


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Related to Mousterian: Acheulean, Aurignacian, Mousterian culture

Mousterian

or

Levalloiso-Mousterian:

see Paleolithic periodPaleolithic period
or Old Stone Age,
the earliest period of human development and the longest phase of mankind's history. It is approximately coextensive with the Pleistocene geologic epoch, beginning about 2 million years ago and ending in various places between
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
As noted, Neanderthals used a mixed set of Mode 2 and 3 techniques--both Acheulean and Mousterian.
But the Mousterian label has been stretched so thin over the last 130 years that the term has become meaningless, Shea contends.
ones usually typical of Mousterian industries) made on large flakes often of nonflint raw materials such as quartzite, mudstone and limestone.
2008), "Auditory Ossicles from Southwest Asian Mousterian Sites," Journal of Human Evolution 54: 414-433.
The area knew industry from ancient times, with excavations conducted by German archeologist Alfred Rust in Yabrud showing that the area was home to the first industry known to man, dating back to the Paleolithic Age, specifically the period when the Mousterian industrial culture emerged circa 80,000-35,000 BC.
Interassemblage variability: The Mousterian and the "functional" argument.
It involves Neanderthal orphans coaxed to mate by a trio of headmistressy women, Nigerian e-mail scams, time travel and psychic permeability, an invented language called Mousterian (after the Paleolithic culture that travels under that name in archeological circles), a poem by Edgar Allan Poe, and figure skating.
Neanderthal and early modern human behavioral variability: A regional-scale approach to lithic evidence for hunting in the Levantine Mousterian.
1966 "A preliminary analysis of functional variability in the Mousterian of Levallois facies", en: American Anthropologist, 68, 2a.
Neanderthal man's culture is largely associated with Mousterian industry, the name of which is derived from the name of the Le Moustier site at Perigord, France, which is characterized by the production of tools made from flakes carefully chipped off a stone core, which were then reworked to achieve the desired piece (a scraper, a scratcher, a spear point, a knife).