mouthfeel

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mouthfeel

[′mau̇th‚fēl]
(food engineering)
An organoleptic property used to describe the overall texture of a food product.
References in periodicals archive ?
v=GOZWV2XxuhA) video , "Why Does Wine Make Your Mouth Feel Dry?
The sensory data indicated that mouth feel and texture of dessert were greatly affected by all hydrocolloids particularly; TSG and TSX were found to be effective to improve the overall quality of dessert (Table 1a-1c).
Following an approach that the great whites of Bordeaux have taken - especially with the addition of semillon and, in this case, some sauvignon gris - the result in a ultra-exotic bouquet of tropical fruit and a rich, ripe mouth feel of toasty pear and soft nectarine fruit.
The emulsified oils found in mayonnaise, sauces and margarine owe their specific mouth feel to how the oil globules become destabilized on the mouth's surface.
Palate: Medium bodied yet slightly creamy mouth feel, vanilla spice, caramel sweetness and baked apple.
According to Norm Leighty of Oakasions, acacia adds floral characteristics to white wines, with added structural mouth feel.
A low tat, low salt sausage that looks like a top quality sausage, tastes likes a top quality sausage and has the texture and mouth feel of a top quality sausage--that's the latest success being celebrated by the new product development department at Snowbird foods.
Distributed in retail four-packs, Fruit-a-Freeze Fruit Bars have texture similar to traditional Mexican paletas in that their ingredients offer a more dense mouth feel.
They contain no trans fats and impart a satisfying, creamy mouth feel and neutral taste to products.
Derived from tapioca, its very fine particle size has a pleasant, non-sandy mouth feel for making healthy baked goods such as moist cookies, muffins and brownies more palatable and appealing.
Understanding the genetic functions and harnessing desirable genes could lead to fat-free cheese with the same mouth feel as regular cheese or allow scientists to create an organism that is resistant to viruses that might delay or interfere with fermentation.