Baganda

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Baganda

(bägän`də), also called Ganda, the largest ethnic group in Uganda. Bagandas comprise about 17% of the population and have the country's highest standard of living and literacy rate. Their traditional homeland is Buganda, an area of central and southern Uganda. Their first king or kabaka, the powerful Kintu, was crowned c.1380. The earliest European explorers to visit Buganda, John SpekeSpeke, John Hanning
, 1827–64, English explorer in Africa. He joined Sir Richard Burton in his expeditions to Somaliland (1854) and to E central Africa (1857–59).
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 and James Grant, dealt with Mutesa, the powerful Bagandan kabaka of the Victorian era. Ugandan president Milton OboteObote, Apollo Milton
, 1924–2005, president of Uganda (1966–71, 1980–85). Obote, a member of the legislative council of Uganda from 1957, founded (1960) the Uganda People's Congress.
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 outlawed the Bagandan and other traditional Ugandan kingships in 1966 and the then-king, Sir Edward Frederick Mutesa II, went into exile in England. In 1993 kingship was restored by President Yoweri Museveni and "King Freddy's" son, Ronald Muwenda Mutebi II, was installed as kabaka.

Baganda

 

Ganda, a people inhabiting southern Uganda. They numbered (together with related peoples, the Basese and the Basingo) about 1.5 million according to a 1967 estimate. The language spoken by the Baganda is Luganda. A significant number of the Baganda are Protestants and Catholics; there are some Muslims, and some still adhere to local traditional beliefs. The Baganda practice agriculture (cotton, manioc, sweet potatoes, bananas). The Baganda constitute the ethnic base of the state of Buganda, which has existed since the 15th century.

REFERENCE

Roscoe, J. The Baganda. London, 1911.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite official attempts to paint the upheavals as minor political blips, associated with alien communists and rabble-rousers, John Sibley, a British historian at Makerere, argued that "Every Muganda, except a few in European employ, gave open support to the disturbances and there was no lack of enthusiasts to join in whenever a mob began to form.
The Abaganda are the most populous ethnic group in Uganda and Kakungulu was thought to be a Muganda.
Poor remuneration, lackadaisical management and mistreatment of these athletes by Athletics Kenya is the main reason why our athletes are falling prey to the oil dollars offered by the gulf kingdoms," says Alloys Muganda, the sports editor of The People Daily.