Mukden Incident


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Mukden Incident:

see Manchurian IncidentManchurian Incident
or Mukden Incident,
1931, confrontation that gave Japan the impetus to set up a puppet government in Manchuria. After the Russo-Japanese War (1904–5), Japan replaced Russia as the dominant foreign power in S Manchuria.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the Japanese-engineered Mukden Incident of 1931 to the end of WWII, a sense of impending war affected Chinese culture, which spurred Communists and Nationalists alike to promote strengthening of the country's citizens' bodies through tiyu (physical education, sports, and physical culture)in their quest to build a strong, militant nation.
Chinese held anti-Japan protests in Beijing and other cities on Tuesday, the 81st anniversary of the start of the 1931 Mukden Incident, also known as the Manchurian Incident, Japan's pretext for invading northeastern China.
Protests reached a peak on Tuesday, the anniversary of the 1931 Mukden Incident, when Japanese Imperial troops staged an attack on a Japanese-owned railway as a pretext for invasion and occupation of present-day northeast China.
On September 18 in 2010, as with 2012, the anniversary of the Mukden Incident (which led to Japan's military takeover of Northeastern China in 1931) generated large-scale protests in China.
have all reportedly suspended operations in the country ahead of the anniversary of the Mukden Incident, also known as the Manchurian Incident, which led to the Japanese invasion of northeastern China.
1931 -- Japan uses Mukden incident -- when explosions led to skirmishes between Chinese and Japanese troops -- as a pretext to occupy Manchuria and set up a puppet state with China's last emperor Pu Yi as the symbolic head.
Brought about by the military elite itself, this transformation was completed by the time of the Mukden Incident in the summer of 1929.
Yang made the comments on the occasion of the 81st anniversary of the Mukden Incident, or Manchurian Incident, in which Japanese military officers blew up a portion of a Japanese railroad in southern Manchuria on Sept.
18," referring to the start of the Mukden Incident, or Manchurian Incident, in which Japanese military officers blew up a portion of a Japanese railroad in southern Manchuria, which Japan used as a pretext for invading northeastern China.
Such protests are likely to continue up to the 81st anniversary Tuesday of the start of the 1931 Mukden Incident, also known as the Manchurian Incident, in which the Imperial Japanese Army blew up a Japanese railway in southern Manchuria to serve as a pretext for invading northeastern China.